fashion revolution · sewing

Reclaimed, Deadstock & Vintage Fabric Resources

As you can tell from reading my blog – I love fabric. But over the years I’ve been very conscious about where my fabric is coming from, and what I’m bringing into my stash. Yes I love refashioning, but I also love buying a gorgeous piece of fabric I don’t have to think about fitting a pattern on. Fabric buying can be very easy, and overwhelming; there are so many options out there – from cheap to very expensive. But the more you question content and the process of making it, fabric buying can get difficult.

This list is focusing on reclaimed, deadstock and vintage textiles. There are many shops that offer sustainably made fabrics, but I know how difficult it can be to find reclaimed materials and these are the sources I get asked about the most!

Reclaimed, Deadstock and Vintage Fabric Resources- Trish Stitched

Here are some terms I look for and what they mean:

Reclaimed: The technical definition of “reclaim” is: “recover (waste material) for reuse; recycle.” (From Oxford Dictionary)

My definition in terms of fabric being reclaimed is: textiles that have been previously discarded and are being saved from landfill, burning or other forms of destruction. This can be leftover textiles from designers or fabric stores.

Recycled: There are a few definitions of Recycled Fabrics including: “textilessorted, graded and reused again to make fabrics for different end uses.” (Vivify Textiles) Such as, using plastic bottles to create new activewear textiles. (When fabric shopping, this term is more often used when describing newly made textiles)

For me, recycled fabrics can also refer to refashioning, or taking a pre-existing textile (clothing, sheet, curtain, etc) and transforming it into something new.

Deadstock: Technical definition: “an amount of a product that a company has bought or made but is unable to sell.” (Cambridge Dictionary.)

In textile terms, deadstock can also refer to leftover fabric that may have defects, and is typically sold off to smaller companies. (Deadstock can sometimes be destroyed through burning or be sent to landfill.) Deadstock is becoming a very popular term in fabric and clothing buying, and if you would to read more about Deadstock, check out this post from Virtue & Vice.

Vintage: Vintage is a generic term for fabric originating from a previous era.

Many people have their own definitions for how old something has to be, to be considered vintage. Usually it is fabric that is 20-30 years old and older. Materials usually become “antique” after 100 years. There is also fabric sold as Deadstock Vintage, another term to look out for when shopping.

Destash: “To remove yarn, fabric, equipment from one’s collection.”  (Your Dictionary)

Destashing is very popular in the sewing world and there are many people who clean out their stashes online in hopes of re-homing their materials. Buying destashed fabric is a great way to get second-hand materials at a lower cost.

Thrifted: “Items bought at a thrift store, flea market, garage sale, or a shop of a charitable organization.” (Definitions.net)

This term can sometimes be used when shopping fabrics, but oftentimes it may fall under the reclaimed, deadstock or recycled label. This phrasing is typically up to the seller to use instead of those previously listed, but still a term to look out for.

And here’s the list!

Deadstock, Reclaimed, and Destashed Fabric: 

Fab Scrap: (USA, NY) My #1 resource for reclaimed fabric. They work with designers to sell/recycle their excess or unusable materials to avoid textiles going to landfill. Located in New York, they have a warehouse where you can buy fabric by the pound and a shop in Manhattan which is a little more curated and fabric is bought by the yard. They also sell some stock and mixed boxes online and they have “insta-sales” on instagram. Fab Scrap also accepts remnants/scraps from sewers to recycle but it will cost $1.50/lb to recycle. (It then gets turned into shoddy, which is a product containing mixed recycled fibers, great for stuffing!)

Queen of Raw: (Global) A marketplace where vendors can sell their deadstock materials. A great place for purchasing large amounts of material for clothing lines, etc. They also offer fabrics in 3 yard minimums for smaller purchases. Located in New York but has sellers all over the world.

FabCycle: (Canada, Vancouver) FabCycle works with designers, factories and schools to collect unused textiles to avoid textile waste from entering landfills. This includes scraps, off cuts, deadstock and end of rolls. Shop online or visit their ReUse Center in Vancouver where they also take fabric donations!

A Thrifty Notion: (USA, KS) A shop that offers deadstock, vintage, and destashed fabrics! They take in a lot of donated materials that other sewers no longer want and sell online and in store. They also offer a “friday feature” of “new” materials in store. They also put together a fantastic Thrift Store Locator List featuring many “Re-use” shops, where you can donate materials and notions locally.

Measure: A Fabric Parlor: (USA, GA) Measure Fabrics offers mostly deadstock fabrics, which are available in limited quantities. I personally love Measure Fabrics and they often do fabric features on Instagram as well!

Scrap- Creative Reuse: (Portland OR, Arcata CA, Denton TX, Baltimore MD, Richmond VA, Ann Arbor MI)  No online shop, but lucky locals can donate their items to Scrap who sells it to the public or donates to teachers or organizations that can use the items. Scrap can be a fantastic resource for fabrics and notions!

Matchpoint Fabrics: (Canada) Matchpoint Fabrics is an online shop that offers mostly sustainable fabric options, but they also have a section of Deadstock Fabric. Most of the deadstock fabrics come directly from mills, TV/film sets & designers.

Haines Collection: (UK)If you are looking for a place to buy upholstery fabrics, Haines Collection is the place! Fabrics in this online shop are leftover from designers and manufacturers in the interior industry. Most of these fabrics are high quality, and come with a higher price tag, but Haines Collection sells them at a much lower cost.

The New Craft House: (UK, East London) An online shop & studio filled with designer deadstock fabric. They are located in East London where you can also take a class, set up a private workshop or attend an event!

(Offset Warehouse: (UK) This shop is mainly focused on sustainable textiles, but says they also offer deadstock. There isn’t currently a specific section for deadstock, so you will have to look at each item, but I thought this would still be a good source to add. )

Vintage:

(Shops that have a passion for reducing waste in the textile industry with a love for vintage textiles)

Revival Fabrics: (USA, OR) An online shop featuring vintage fabrics from the 1920’s- 1970’s! This is a great spot for movie costume designers, commercial set stylists, and period re-enactors. They also have vintage pillowcases and sheets still in their packaging!

Olive Road London: (UK, London) A beautiful collection of vintage textiles, including dress fabrics and barkcloths. I love how this online shop allows you to browse by decades! (Olive Road London’s website doesn’t have US shipping but you can contact them directly for purchasing in US!)

Pink Peacock: (Australia) A beautifully curated online shop featuring vintage textiles. Beware, you may purchase more than just fabric here! (Seriously their vintage home wares are amazing!)

Retro Age Vintage Fabrics: (Australia) In business for 15 years, this is a huge resource for vintage fabrics and their online shop allows you to shop by era, content, design, color, or quantity.

Etsy Shops

Craft And Thrift Shop: (UK, Scotland) Amy runs an etsy shop filled with deadstock, thrifted and vintage fabrics. Fabrics are sold by the meter, but she also offers scrap packs and notions. (Amy has become a friend over on Instagram and I personally had a great experience sewing with fabric from her shop!)

Etsy shops that offer mostly vintage fabrics but also sell destash fabrics, vintage sheets and/or sewing notions:

The Estate Stash: (USA, TN) (shop also sells fabric swatch books)

Found Fabrics Shop: (USA, OR)

Life in the Sass Lane: (USA, NY)

Lingon Berries and Moss: (USA, CO)

Dragonfly Cottage Shop: (USA, MN)

Lizi Rose: (USA, CA) (Destash denim scraps)

Bout Flowers: (UK, Durham)

Jaipur Design Shop: (India) (Shop sells beautiful vintage sari’s and recycled fabrics)

Instagram

@shopwellfibre (USA): Sells secondhand fabrics through instagram. (sewing account here! )

@suziesvintageshop (UK Only): Vintage textiles in her ebay shop – and see more behind the scenes on her other instagram account: Suzie Sharp Vintage!

@farmandtablefabrics: Sells through instagram! Posts sales of vintage and reclaimed textiles.

@shopmakethislook: Sells Vintage fabrics, often shown with inspiration garments! Auctions on Instagram.  Follow her other account to see her beautiful makes: Make This Look

@vintagefabricsandsheets (Australia): Sells vintage fabrics and sheets on instagram!

If there’s a shop you don’t see listed that I should add, let me know! I will do my best to update this list.

(Please keep in mind, these are shops focused on selling reclaimed, deadstock, and vintage fabrics. Sustainable textile shops are also wonderful to purchase from but not included in this list. If you are looking for Sustainable shops, please read Halfmoon Atelier’s list!)

fashion revolution · refashion · sewing · Tutorials

Fashion Revolution Week: Low Waste Alternatives & Skirt to Top Refashion

Hey world changers – how are you doing? We have all been going through some difficult times and I haven’t been talking about it much because I use my sewing as a form of distraction. I hope these refashions & posts have distracted/inspired you in these times!

Today I’m sharing another simple refashion with a “before” you may be familiar with! I made this skirt several years ago, and I’m definitely not the same size I used to be! This skirt stayed in my wardrobe because I love the fabric so much, and I recently moved it to my refashion pile because I wanted to be able to wear it once again!

Fashion Revolution Week: Skirt to Top Refashion- Trish Stitched

This refashion is based off of this cute top! I am a huge fan of gathering and have done multiple peplum refashions, but haven’t tried an empire style top! This skirt was a very simple pleated skirt with a side zipper. Here’s how I refashioned it:

I took off the waistband, removed the zipper and removed the pleats. I took 5″ off the top of the skirt portion, and used that and the waistband to cut a new bodice and straps. I made a lining from some fabric in my stash. After the bust portion was sewn, I gathered the remaining skirt and attached it to the bust. Then the zipper was re-inserted on the back, and straps were sewn on!

Fashion Revolution Week: Skirt to Top Refashion- Trish StitchedFashion Revolution Week: Skirt to Top Refashion- Trish StitchedFashion Revolution Week: Skirt to Top Refashion- Trish Stitched

For the bust, I used a pattern I had in my stash, McCalls 6838, but you can use all different patterns to get a similar result! I made a muslin of the bust portion because I had such little material to work with. Some of the pieces had to be franken-stitched together before making the bust.

Fashion Revolution Week: Skirt to Top Refashion- Trish StitchedFashion Revolution Week: Skirt to Top Refashion- Trish Stitched

Here’s a short video with some behind the scenes!

{Music in Video is Early Hours by Ikson on Inshot App}

Starting on a sustainable fashion journey can often lead into wanting to go sustainable in other areas of life. For the past few years, I’ve been taking small steps towards going “greener” in other parts of my life, mostly trying to reduce the amount of plastic and trash we create. (We already do a lot of the basics, bringing reusable bags to stores, using metal straws and re-usable cups.) My rule of thumb is, when something in our household is running low, I start looking for alternative products, or a more sustainable system. This is a slower process to go waste free but one that is working well for us. Progress over perfection!

Here’s a few of the products I’ve researched, fallen in love with and now use on a daily basis!

Blueland Hand Soap & Cleaners – This was an instagram ad that got my attention. When we first moved into our home we bought glass soap dispensers and bulk liquid soap, but as my bulk was finally running out, I decided to give Blueland a try! We were also running low on household cleaners so we purchased the whole cleaning set. Blueland sells “forever” bottles and tablets. You keep the same bottles, use tap water to fill the bottles and pop in a tablet to refill the soap dispensers and cleaners. The foam soap is amazing, and the cleaners have been great! I bought a double batch of soap so we are stocked for awhile!

Dropps Laundry & Dishwasher Detergent Pods – It took some time to switch our laundry detergent because I’ve had bad skin reactions to detergents in the past and have been afraid to try a new product, but Dropps have been incredible! Dropps are pods and what I love is that they aren’t sold in a giant plastic container! We also bought the dishwasher pods, which we love! Another sustainable option I almost went with is Tru Earth, which are laundry strips!

Soda Stream – I know this is a strange one to be on my sustainable list but it’s a product that has cut down on so much of our waste. Drew and I love bubbly water and we would go through a case of La Croix a week. The recycling bin was getting outrageous, so we switched to Soda Stream last year. We don’t drink much soda, so our system is just used for carbonated water, and this little unit has been awesome!

Next alternatives we are trying: Shampoo and conditioner bars! It took some time to research, but I’m hoping the ones I ordered work for my hair! They are set to arrive next week so I will update soon!

What are some of your low-waste alternatives?

There are a few low waste youtuber’s I love following, and if this is a topic you are interested in, check them out!

Shelbizleee

Sedona Christina

fashion revolution

Fashion Revolution Week: Secondhand Shopping & Thrift Tips!

It’s Wednesday and we are halfway through Fashion Revolution Week! Today I’m taking a short break from sewing projects to talk about my favorite Haulternative to Fast Fashion! For the past several years, thrifting has been my #1 way to get a “new” wardrobe. I’ve been cleaning out all the clothes I don’t wear or fit my style, and I’m mindfully filling it in with secondhand finds (along with upcycles and handmades of course!)

My #1 favorite resource to shop secondhand is ThredUp. It is so easy to find whatever I’m looking for with their filters, and returns are a breeze! I’ve been shopping on ThredUp for about 3 years now, and just became a ThredUp Ambassador! This is a huge deal for me, because this is a company I really believe in and love. I don’t work with a lot of brands because they don’t align with my values, but I’m thrilled to share all about ThredUp, which I do over on Instagram all the time anyway! This floral romper and these flats are from ThredUp!

Trish Stitched

Like I mentioned in yesterday’s post, most of my activewear wardrobe is second hand and comes from ThredUp. I like to filter by condition of apparel, New with Tags or Like New condition to ensure I will get the most life out of my “new” garments. I also shop ThredUp a lot for secondhand shoes! It can be very hard to find my size (Size 5) in a retail store, and even harder to find a pair while thrifting but I’ve found several pairs of shoes on ThredUp! Here’s my current used shoe collection! (From Poshmark & ThredUp)

Trish Stitched

{If you are interested in shopping on ThredUp, follow this link to get $10 to spend (I’ll also get $10 for the referral!)}

But this isn’t the only place I shop used. Poshmark is my second favorite online resource. You shop from individual sellers, but there is a lot more variety and you can ask questions about items before purchasing! Another place similar to Poshmark is Depop, which I haven’t bought from yet. And there are your more popular places: Ebay and Etsy (for vintage). And for luxury items – I love looking (not doing much shopping on this site!) at The Real Real. Here’s one of my favorite Poshmark purchases- overalls! 

Trish Stitched

I also try to go to my local thrift stores, although I can’t always get there (especially now on Stay at Home orders!). There are some local church thrift stores in my area, a few chain stores, and vintage shops as well. Among those, my favorite spots are Plato’s Closet and Buffalo Exchange because they are a little more curated. Winter coat from Plato’s Closet!

Trish Stitched

Thrifting in person can be disappointing, and you can definitely walk away empty handed. I’ve shared my tips for thrifting before but want to share them again for anyone looking to start thrifting!

Trish Stitched

Thrift Tips

-Go often! Stores get new inventory daily, especially if they also have a donation drop-off in store. New clothes are usually put on rolling racks on the floor before getting sorted throughout the day.

-If you like something, try it on. Vintage sizes are different from modern sizes, and something labeled at a different size than you wear may fit. And if something doesn’t fit, remember the clothes are wrong – not you!

-Thoroughly look over each piece for wear and stains. If you are thrifting for clothing to wear off the rack, be sure that the pieces you pick up aren’t worn. Check the butt and crotch of pants, underarms and necklines on dresses and tops, and double check zippers work and buttons are all there. If something has a small hole or stain, will you fix it? I have a pile of pieces that I say I will fix but rarely get around to them!

-Now, if you fall in love with something that is stained or worn and you have some sewing skills – take that piece home and get creative!

-Check all sections of the store. I like to take a look down all the aisles if I have the time, some items get misplaced, or hidden by other shoppers. And don’t forget to shop the linen section for tablecloths that can make beautiful pieces and sheets that can be used for muslins!

-Check care labels. I find a lot of clothes that are Dry Clean Only, but don’t go to the dry cleaners often. I only take those pieces if I really love it and can see it working well in my wardrobe. This is also a great way to add in more natural fibers to your closet. Cottons, linens, and silks can be plentiful when thrifting, and at a lower price point.

-If you are looking for worn clothing to refashion, ask an store employee if there are pieces you can go through that weren’t good enough to be sold.

What’s your favorite thrift score? One of my favorites was this Anthropologie Dress I bought for $7 that fits perfectly! The other, a faux leather jacket from a San Francisco Thrift Shop!

Trish StitchedTrish Stitched