#RefashionFriday · handmade wardrobe · refashion · sewing · Tutorials

#Refashion Friday Denim Dress Refashion

It’s the last Friday of August! Where has the summer gone?! I am always a couple steps behind when it comes to sewing for the appropriate season, so here we are again, with a garment perfect for summer. First things first, the Before & After!

#RefashionFriday Denim Dress Refashion

I spotted this dress at the thrift store two weeks before I actually bought it. I passed on it the first time around because I didn’t see the potential. After I passed it by, I started seeing denim dresses everywhere and I really wanted one! Once I saw it on the rack again, I picked it up even though I didn’t have a pattern in mind.

It sat in my pile for a few weeks while deciding what to do with it. Because it was much larger than my actual size, I had a lot of material to work with and didn’t want to waste it on the wrong pattern. This piece could be something cute, but in order to stay in my wardrobe, it had to be wearable.

I started my research on denim dresses and noticed that the 2018 summer silhouettes showed a lot of dresses with the front button placket. For refashioning this dress in a similar style, my first thought was the Fiona Sundress by Closet Case Patterns. With the two different length options and different back options, this allowed a lot of design freedom to fit in with what I could make with my current dress.

I shared my thoughts on this dress on Instagram, and another seamstress suggested the Jessica Dress rather than the Fiona Sundress. I wasn’t familiar with the Jessica Dress, but after looking it up – it was a no brainer. It was so perfect for this dress.

#RefashionFriday Denim Dress Refashion#RefashionFriday Denim Dress Refashion#RefashionFriday Denim Dress Refashion

DSC_0256#RefashionFriday Denim Dress Refashion#RefashionFriday Denim Dress Refashion

The Jessica Dress is a FREE dress pattern from Mimi G. If you aren’t familiar with Mimi G, she is basically the queen of the sewing community. She has a pattern line with Simplicity, an online sewing academy, a HUGE online following, a digital sewing magazine and she just recently started a podcast! Man, I don’t know how she does it all, but I am totally in awe! I’ve loved Mimi G for some time, and her style is fantastic (and if you have a creative business, or want to start one, her podcast is AMAZING!). I remember liking this dress when it first came out, but I didn’t take note of the pattern because I don’t normally wear dresses. But as soon as I saw looked at the pattern again, I quickly downloaded the pattern, and got to cutting!

#RefashionFriday Denim Dress Refashion

For today’s refashioning tip I wanted to share exactly how I used the pattern to work with the existing dress. Most of the time, when I use a sewing pattern it becomes all about pattern placement on the original garment, and I’m not concerned with keeping the silhouette or details of the original garment. This dress was different, and I wanted to be able to use as much of the dress without cutting.

First step was to seam rip the skirt, while leaving the buttons in tack. Since this was one of the main areas I wanted to keep, it was important to leave as much of the area untouched as I could.

#RefashionFriday Denim Dress Refashion

Next was to cut the bodice. I removed the breast pockets, but since the denim had faded around the original stitching lines, I knew I would have to add them back on.

#RefashionFriday Denim Dress Refashion

Since the button placket already had the seam allowance in the center front, I didn’t need to include the allowance in the CF pattern piece (in the photo the seam allowance is folded in). I wasn’t paying attention to where the buttons would line up on my final dress, and the top one was a little too low for the sweetheart style (but more on that later).

DSC_0174-002

Because of the sweetheart neckline, the front bodice was cut into parts. The bodice side front kept its seam allowances and was able to fit on the rest of the denim dress bodice (and used just a little of the sleeve). I did this cutting method to both sides. I then reattached the pocket following the original stitching lines.

#RefashionFriday Denim Dress Refashion#RefashionFriday Denim Dress Refashion

I had a lot more freedom to cut in the back of the dress, and fit the center back and side back pieces on the back of the dress. I was also able to fit the back facing pieces.

#RefashionFriday Denim Dress Refashion

I followed the instructions for sewing the bodice together, just omitting the sections about the button placket. Next up was hemming the skirt, and gathering and reattaching it to fit! I didn’t need to cut any of the skirt since the pattern called for a gather skirt, it was already on the dress, I just had to gather it more than the original dress had been gathered.

Originally, I chopped 10″ off the hem, and it left me with a beautiful length. I tried the dress on with wedges, and the length was super sophisticated for my figure, but realistically, I knew I would mostly be wearing this dress with flats. The longer length in flats made me look short and stubby, which isn’t ideal. Hemming it an extra 2″ made it the perfect length for both!

DSC_0182

The tricky part for me was with the top button. I needed another button to close the top, but didn’t have proper spacing to make a button look good. Since this dress required a facing, I used it to add a hidden buttonhole. While it’s serving its use as a buttonhole, it is also hidden from the outside of the garment, so it looks like a much cleaner finish!

#RefashionFriday Denim Dress Refashion

#RefashionFriday Denim Dress Refashion

I really love using the existing details in a garment, especially when they are details that can save a lot of time! Making all the buttonholes and sewing them on would have added a lot of time to the project, but being able to keep the originals were a huge help!

#RefashionFriday Denim Dress Refashion#RefashionFriday Denim Dress Refashion#RefashionFriday Denim Dress Refashion

I had a lot of fun sewing this piece, and it definitely tested my creativity. I’m excited to look for more dresses with front buttons and use this technique again!

A few notes on the pattern: I made a size XS, and it fits beautifully. The pattern was drafted great, and for a free pattern, the amount of detail in the instructions are amazing. What I do wish is that there were a few more details lined out for placements. There were no buttonhole placement markings and no pocket markings on the pattern pieces, which I look forward to when sewing other patterns. (I personally omitted the front skirt pockets because I thought they would overwhelm my body. ) But that’s my only issue! And since I didn’t need those bits of information, I really didn’t have an issue when making!

I would most definitely make this pattern again. I love the fit, and I love the end result!

Here’s some denim inspiration! This type of dress has a lot of options – even while keeping the buttons! One of my favorites is a collarless denim jacket – with the extra hem from a dress, you would have plenty of fabric to make long sleeves!

Links (clockwise): Denim Jacket, Denim Dress 1, Denim Dress 2, Denim Skirt, Denim Dress 3 (original link didn’t work (damn fashion website slide shows!) but search for denim dress on pinterest and you’ll find it!)

Have a great weekend!

Advertisements
handmade wardrobe · sewing

Coming Up Roses Wedding Guest Dress

Hello, hello! I usually write blog posts during the day or in the early morning, but this night seems like the perfect time. I’m watching the ONLY craft show I know of, Making It, on NBC. Have you seen it? We are on week 2, so not deep into the show just yet, but it’s cute. I do wish there was a seamstress to represent the sewing community, but the makers on there are all very talented. And I am a huge fan of Parks and Rec, so seeing Amy Poehler and Nick Offerman together again is a dream come true! (Now if only Andy and April would make a surprise appearance!)

I finally took detailed photos of the dress I wore to my cousins wedding and am very excited to share!

Coming Up Roses Wedding Guest Dress - Trish Stitched

I didn’t intend on making a dress. After my weight struggles, I was feeling so discouraged, I just wanted to buy a dress, but once I started feeling more myself, I wanted to show off my hard work. (I was also really scared that the dresses in my wardrobe wouldn’t fit so making a dress that fit my current measurements felt safer).

I wanted a dress to accentuate my top half, something a bit low cut and flirty, because that isn’t my typical style. I had a really difficult time finding a pattern to go with the look I wanted. The skirt portion wasn’t as important to me, but I really wanted a bodice with boning, spaghetti straps and low V neck. This style is becoming very popular in the “wedding guest dress” world and I wanted a fashionable piece rather than a timeless piece. I was also looking for a pattern that included a full lining with clean finishes. There are so few occasions that I make pretty formal dresses, that every chance to test my skills, I want to take.

I always want to make indie patterns first. They normally fit better, and have detailed sew-a-longs with the pattern in case you run into any problems. The issue with a lot of indie brands is that they don’t dive far into the special occasion dresses. Sure there are a few full length options, and some fun flirty dresses, but I couldn’t find a pattern with the structure I wanted. Needing to turn to the “big 4” of sewing patterns, my first thought was Vogue. But they didn’t have anything I was looking for! (Man, some of these patterns are really bad!!) But I finally found the perfect pattern in McCalls 7720.

Coming Up Roses Wedding Guest Dress - Trish Stitched

Once the pattern was selected, I ran to Joann’s to find fabric. I knew I needed to start this dress fast, and didn’t have time to wait for shipping, so I headed to my local Joann’s where I found the perfect print. This rose print brocade was not on the “recommended fabrics” list, but I knew the pattern would be able to support the structure of the fabric.

With my measurements, I made a size 10. Normally in McCalls, I’m a size 8, but sizing up a bit was a chance I needed to take, as it’s easier to make something smaller than making something bigger! I also made a muslin of the top, because I wanted to be sure those measurements were accurate. My muslin fit well, as I was mostly concerned with the size around my torso, I was afraid I wouldn’t be able to fit in it once the zipper was in. Once I determined the fit was comfortable, I moved onto my fabric. The bodice came together very quickly. Even with the addition of boning, and a fully lined top, I was surprised it was a decently quick/easy sew.

Coming Up Roses Wedding Guest Dress - Trish Stitched

One of my alterations to this dress was with the straps. I never understand using ribbon for straps. I get that it makes life easier, since you don’t have to turn a skinny tube inside-out, but to me, real straps give the dress a more professional feel. If you look at the actual pattern, I made the straps much shorter, meaning they don’t technically sit where the pattern calls them to sit. This was a personal preference, and in reality, I could have sized down on the bodice, but I didn’t have enough fabric to re-cut.

Coming Up Roses Wedding Guest Dress - Trish Stitched

My original plan was to shorten the skirt to right above the knee, to keep with my flirty vibe, but after making the skirt that came with the pattern, it was a no brainer to keep it. I just had to cut a good chunk off the bottom to align better with my height. I cut off about 3.5″. I also thought the bodice would look too “long”, but once it was pinned in place, it hit appropriately and I kept the length.

The skirt pleats were…interesting. I had to read the directions over several times because the lines just weren’t making sense. These pleats are huge. Like, really big. It makes for a VERY full skirt, and by making it in a brocade, it was super roomy. I did love that the pattern called for sewing a hem band, rather than just turning up 5/8″.

Coming Up Roses Wedding Guest Dress - Trish StitchedComing Up Roses Wedding Guest Dress - Trish StitchedComing Up Roses Wedding Guest Dress - Trish Stitched

Coming Up Roses Wedding Guest Dress - Trish StitchedComing Up Roses Wedding Guest Dress - Trish Stitched

After completing the dress, and trying it on, I noticed there was a little gaping in the bodice, as my bust didn’t fill the bodice as it was supposed to. This alteration didn’t appear in my muslin, partially because I didn’t add the lining. I don’t think my bust measurement decreased that much within the 2 weeks I was making this dress, but that was one of the first sections of my body to go back to normal when I changed my diet plan, so the fit could be a mixture of things.

I, of course, didn’t want to take the entire dress apart to fit this issue, and I considered just leaving it, but as the point of my new dress was to show off my hard work, I couldn’t let it go. Since my dress form isn’t super true to size anymore either, I turned the dress inside out, zipped it up (which is not easy, thanks Drew), and pinned darts in place on my own body to keep it from gaping. (You can also see a little bit of pulling on the dress above the dart, which I’m not very pleased with, but my dart alteration happened the day of the wedding and I didn’t have that much time to fix it. Thankfully when I’m wearing it, it looks much better. If I remember to do so, I will go in and let the dart out on this side a bit more.)

Coming Up Roses Wedding Guest Dress - Trish StitchedComing Up Roses Wedding Guest Dress - Trish Stitched

This alteration wasn’t the cleanest finish, and you can certainly see where the dress was fixed, but the fit is much better this way.

I tend to stay away from alterations in finished garments, as that is an area that is super scary for me to wrap my head around. I don’t mind doing them for myself, but whenever someone asks me to fix something for more than just a simple stitch, I turn them down. I hope to get better over time, and learn the “cause and effect” of fit issues.

I LOVE the clean interior on this dress. I didn’t do any fancy seams, just finished with some serging, but you can only see them when you lift the lining. The skirt also has a very faint high-low look, which I love.

Coming Up Roses Wedding Guest Dress - Trish StitchedComing Up Roses Wedding Guest Dress - Trish StitchedComing Up Roses Wedding Guest Dress - Trish StitchedComing Up Roses Wedding Guest Dress - Trish StitchedComing Up Roses Wedding Guest Dress - Trish StitchedComing Up Roses Wedding Guest Dress - Trish Stitched

All in all, if I were to make this dress again, I would size down. I would also take the time to make a better muslin. I’m getting better at making a practice version, but sill need to take it further. (I’m still learning guys!) The finished dress is pretty and comfortable, and was a very easy sew, which all make me really happy with the outcome! Obviously the dress isn’t perfect, but I’m still proud of it.

The wedding itself was nice, and I’m happy the rain held off on the outdoor ceremony until we went inside! Since my grandparent’s passed, we haven’t been that close with my mom’s side of the family, so it was a little awkward, but I’m happy that my parent’s, sister and Drew make family events fun.

I was only able to get a few photos wearing the dress, but it held up well on the dance floor! We have another wedding to attend in October, and since that is Halloween month, I think having this dress to wear will make the month go smoother.

Coming Up Roses Wedding Guest Dress - Trish Stitched

Coming Up Roses Wedding Guest Dress - Trish Stitched

Drew and I have been to A LOT of weddings in the past few years, and it’s been a fun adventure. We pretty much know what we would and wouldn’t want for our “big day”, even though we aren’t engaged hah! But lets be honest here, I’ve been planning for a long time – even though I keep it in my head. I have to say, the older I get, the simpler I want my wedding to be and elopement is looking like a really great option (although that would never fly with my guy!) There are a few things I know for sure, the man I want to marry and that I want to make my wedding dress. Having practice formal dresses get me a step closer to creating my perfect dress!

Dress Details:

Pattern: McCall’s 7720

Size Cut: 10

Alterations Made: Fabric Straps, Added bust darts, Hemmed 3.5″

Fabric: Pink Roses on Black Brocade – Joann Fabrics

Coming Up Roses Wedding Guest Dress - Trish StitchedComing Up Roses Wedding Guest Dress - Trish Stitched

#RefashionFriday · handmade wardrobe · inspiration · refashion · Uncategorized

#RefashionFriday Denim Jacket Re-mix

Happy Friday!

This refashion has been such a long time in the making, I am so excited to share it with you! The story for how this came about it a little long, so I wanted to share my photos in-between all that text!

DSC_0050

Before this refashion, the only denim jacket in my wardrobe was from middle school. I feel like I’ve mentioned that before here on the blog, but it’s true, my Gap Kids denim jacket is still getting its wear in my wardrobe. The sleeves are way too short, and the body looks awkwardly short with pants and shirts, so the arms always stay rolled, and I only wear it over dresses. I don’t wear it all that often, but I haven’t found a RTW version that I liked to replace it.

So when Seamwork Audrey came out, I knew it was a pattern to go on my “make list”. My initial thought was to make it out of recycled materials, because there is a crazy amount of used denim in the world! The only old jeans I had in my stash were a mix of light and dark denim and I just didn’t want that much shade difference to make it look super upcycled. Not having the proper pieces, I decided to wait to make it.

DSC_0034

A few weeks ago I was thrifting for some jeans for another project (I’ll share soon!) and had some leg remnants left over – as well as an extra pair I didn’t end up using for the other project. So I finally had a good amount of fabric to play with!

DSC_0100-001DSC_0017-006

The plan was in place, the materials gathered, I was ready. Then I saw this beautiful photo on pinterest and a little lightbulb went off in my head. I would finally be able to use this fabric remnant I’ve been dying to use!

We all have those pieces in our stash that you have a general idea for, and even though it doesn’t feel 100% right, there is an eventual purpose for that fabric. No, just me the hoarder? Alrighty then.  Well, I had this remnant I got from a friend and the print was so beautiful, I wanted to make a shirt for myself to enjoy the print. I was struggling with finding the right pattern and fabric to mix with it, and (if you zoom in on the photo) there were grommets on each panel, so the only true usable piece was the top corner. So this piece sat until I could spend more time on it. (I should also mention it’s similar to a quilting cotton)

IMG_6897[2602]

DSC_0041-001

After seeing that inspiration, I knew this fabric was destined to go with my new denim jacket.

I have a huge problem when it comes to sewing projects, because even if I have a whole pile of unfinished things, I need to start new ideas to constantly keep my mind flowing. So I left behind a dress due in a few weeks and cutting out new backpacks to make this jacket.

Seamwork’s goal has always been about quick projects you can finish in a few hours, and I’m not sure why my mind accepted that to be true for something like a denim jacket. They shifted their pattern’s a few months ago to be a little more detailed, so this project took way longer than expected. I was hoping to finish last week, but I really wanted to take more time to make it perfect, so I waited to share and I think it was worth it.

DSC_0055-002

Audrey has a lot of pattern pieces.  And since I’m tiny, my jeans are tiny, so I had a lot less fabric to work with – and I really had to stretch my thinking when cutting out the fabric. I used one pair of remnant jean legs, one full pair of jeans, and had to make the sleeves and a few other pieces out of fabric leftover from my handmade jeans, as well as using the fabric remnant for the back piece and pocket linings.  If you want to make your own recycled denim jacket, I would suggest to get 4-5 pairs, to be safe.

DSC_0188-001DSC_0176

I have seen versions of recycled denim jackets (scroll down to see more inspo!) and knew I wanted mine to have symmetry and purpose, not just a bunch of scraps thrown together. I made sure each side “matched” denim (ex. each center middle panel were cut from the same pair of jeans). When it comes to using multiple pieces to make something new, it really comes down to fabric placement to create the final look.

DSC_0119-003

Details about Audrey:

Cut: Size 2

Modifications to pattern: Added 1″ to the sides of Back Center Panel & removed 1″ from Back Side Panel.

Problem Areas: The welt pockets. I’ve made welt pockets before (Refashioned Bomber) but they are not commonly on my radar. Once I read the directions about 10 times to let them really sink in, it all clicked. Seamwork does have an article about Welt Pockets, which is a great resource as well.

Everything else went together smooth. I also ran out of topstitching thread, so not all areas have the pretty gold stitching, but I think it works out well that way.

DSC_0114-001DSC_0124DSC_0120-001DSC_0117-001DSC_0138-002

Details about my back modification: My fabric panel had this beautiful border and I wanted to use at least a bit of it on the back. To make this happen, I extended the back center panel 1″ on both sides, and took 1″ from the back side panel to account for the modification. I also quilted my back fabric to give it a little more body. It was a simple quilting, but adding batting and a backing, definitely gave the back a sturdier feel.

I added this lace leftover from my refashioned kimono right under the panel. Originally I had it going cross the entire back, but re-did it to go across just the panel as it looks cleaner.

DSC_0186-003

My hope for this jacket is to rough it up a little. It does have a worn in feel since it’s almost all used jeans, but taking some sand paper or a razor to a few sections is something I’m looking into. I also wouldn’t mind adding more trim if I come across cohesive trim I like. I really feel like this could turn into one of those pieces that stays in my wardrobe until I’m old and grey and my kids want to borrow it for a “retro feel”. I’m excited to see what adventures there are for this jacket in the future.

Inspiration: 

This etsy shop is filled with “festival style” denim jackets and it’s huuuuge embellishment inspo!

il_570xN.1153702354_gmyl

Add a little colored denim for a more unique look.

fa329eae74c020192dd330b1e32c37c1

or mix light and dark denim like this:

3f081fd9c7e1398f8fd08068e0ee56e3

The Pin that started it all.

lola-guarch-12-min-e1526550881709

The next jacket isn’t super related but I have to share because it’s amaaazing!

A girl after my own creative heart: Once Upon A Lauren was featured on Hoboken Girl awhile ago and I’ve been in love with her work since! Tell me this hand-painted leather jacket isn’t drop dead GORGEOUS! Thrift Upcycling at it’s finest!

il_570xN.1520508802_536s

If you spot a great denim or leather jacket at a thrift store, or have one gathering dust in the back of your closet, I hope this inspires you to have a little fun!

handmade wardrobe · sewing

Summer Floral Blackwood Cardigan

Happy Saturday!

Last weekend Drew and I hosted our first party in our home, and it was a whirlwind. We’ve had multiple projects going on in and outside the house, so just prepping for people coming over was a huge chore. My future sewing space is coming along, our first floor bathroom had a serious facelift, and a gigantic holly bush is finally gone from the front of our house! I am preparing a blog post filled with our projects so far, but today I’m talking apparel!

I wanted a quick sewing project and was browsing through my stash for inspiration, and came across this beautiful knit I picked up in LA last year from Michael Levine Loft. If I remember correctly, I bought a yard and a half, thinking maybe a dress would be fun. To be honest, I didn’t want to mess with linings with this fabric and after leaving it out of sight for a bit, I thought this would actually make a really pretty cardigan. The cut outs add a fun detail, which I rarely see in a colorful knit.

I know, a cardigan in summer? But I LOVE summer. I love the heat and the sunshine, and the past week of heatwave in Jersey has not been any damper on my days. Even though temperatures have been in the 90s-100s, I still get chilled easily, especially when the air conditioners are constantly running (no thanks to Drew!). Because of this, cardigans are a year round staple. I finished my first Blackwood Cardigan a few weeks ago but just got a handsome hand to help with photos (thanks, Drew!). 

I bought the Blackwood Cardigan pattern awhile ago when Helen was having a sale, and it’s been sitting in my stash waiting for fabric. I’ve been meaning to try this pattern and nail down my size and fit, and now was the time!

Summer Floral Blackwood Cardigan - Trish StitchedSummer Floral Blackwood Cardigan - Trish Stitched

The pattern was wonderfully made and written and I love the two length options (have you checked out the inspiration on Instagram for this?! #swoonworthy!) I made a size Small, View A and it fits great. I had to shorten the arms a bit since petite body = petite arms, but other than that, no alterations were made.

Summer Floral Blackwood Cardigan - Trish StitchedSummer Floral Blackwood Cardigan - Trish StitchedSummer Floral Blackwood Cardigan - Trish Stitched

I serged all my edges before I even started sewing. Since the fabric is decently “see-through” I wanted to be sure the edges weren’t raw. I also omitted the pockets because I didn’t want this breezy cardigan to feel heavy with anything extra. I was also a little concerned with having a bottom band, and even the wrist band because I didn’t want the wrong side of the fabric to show through, but after completing it, I don’t mind the up close look.

Summer Floral Blackwood Cardigan - Trish StitchedSummer Floral Blackwood Cardigan - Trish StitchedSummer Floral Blackwood Cardigan - Trish Stitched

A few notes:

I LOVE that this pattern comes in layers. This means that when you are going to print your PDF, you only have to print your size!

This cardigan does not cover as much in front as my store bought ones. This is the style, and it is made for layering, but something to consider if this isn’t your ideal cardigan style.

I can’t wait to make more of these cardigans! This is going to be one of those “staple patterns” that I make a few versions of. Some will probably be pretty basic and boring, but those are going to be my most worn!

Summer Floral Blackwood Cardigan - Trish Stitched

Enjoy the rest of your weekend!

being ethical · handmade wardrobe · sewing

Kalle Shirt & Fashion Revolution

Fashion Revolution week is just a few days away, and while my mind is on the cause all year round, it’s coming up on the time to inform and inspire – and I have big plans for doing just that next week!

Not sure what Fashion Revolution week is?

 

“On 24 April 2013, the Rana Plaza building in

Bangladesh collapsed. 1,138 people died and

another 2,500 were injured, making it the fourth

largest industrial disaster in history.

That’s when Fashion Revolution was born.

There were five garment factories in Rana Plaza all manufacturing clothing for big global brands. The victims were mostly young women.

WHAT NEEDS TO CHANGE:
The Model, Material, and Mindset”

 

Fashion Revolution is about asking retailers who made the clothes they sell. Are they working in safe conditions and getting paid fairly? Are retailers following environmentally safe practices to ensure a healthy world? Clothing doesn’t just magically land on a shelf for you to buy. There are a lot of steps and people garments go through to end up in your closet.

For the past few years, I’ve been an advocate for Fashion Revolution because, as a maker, I know firsthand just how much time and energy can go into making a garment. It’s been an important mission for me because I believe every single person that works in the fashion industry deserves a voice. From the farmers to the makers- working environments should be safe and wages should be fair.

FashRev_BrandAssetsforSocialMedia_11

For me personally, I’ve made it a mission to buy as little as possible from retail stores. I still buy basic necessities like underwear and socks, but almost everything else is made or bought second hand. (I also buy shoes, because that’s a whole ‘nother beast to tackle!)

But two weeks ago I had a breakdown. I was going to a concert for Drew’s co-worker and had nothing to wear. My go-to spring jacket wasn’t fitting comfortably (damn you, winter body!) and I was feeling really crappy about myself. So I ran to Target, and bought a jacket.

It’s actually a really cute jacket, and in a color I’ve been dying to make, but haven’t had the time. And I’ve worn it several times since purchasing. Is it the best quality and fit? No. Did I know that going into purchasing? Hell yea. But I know that I’m going to wear it constantly and I’m happy my sewing list hasn’t added a new item. What’s even better is, once this jacket has had it’s day in my wardrobe, I will be happy to refashion it!

Fashion Revolution isn’t about denying your shopping addiction. It’s about making smarter choices and getting major retailers to make changes. It’s about calling out a retailer and asking them to be more transparent. The more people who ask, the less they can deny an answer.

Kalle Shirt - Trish Stitched

Target, my new jacket goes great with my ‘me made’ Kalle Shirt! I know who made my top, but who made my jacket?

DSC_0060-014Kalle Shirt - Trish Stitched

I’ve done a little research about Target’s brands, and the company is filled with good and bad. I’m no expert, and I haven’t yet taken the time to fully research, but from the basics, they want to be ethical but still need to work on their transparency with each individual brand they carry. I will certainly need to do more research, and encourage you to give a little shoutout to a store you love and ask what their practices are!

 

A few more details about my Kalle Shirt. I made View B with a popover placket and band collar. The fabric was from my trip to California – I scored it at Michael Levine’s Discount Loft! I have no idea what it is but it was a pain to work with. It was slippery and did not liked to be marked with any kind of pen/pencil. It also didn’t care to be interfaced and I had to re-do the hem three times.

Kalle Shirt - Trish StitchedKalle Shirt - Trish StitchedKalle Shirt - Trish Stitched

This is not my best make, but it’s still pretty good. There are a few things I would change, but I worked SO. HARD. to get the prints to line up nicely, that I’m pretty proud of the result. Since the fabric was slippery, I had a difficult time with the collar band, and the topstitching is a little wonky, but it’s one of those things only I would notice.

This Kalle had a test run yesterday, and it’s super comfy and I really like that it covers my behind. I’m not a leggings person, so I don’t really like tunics, but this is the perfect balance between long and loooong.

I cropped my Kalle a few inches (to be honest I can’t remember how many) and took the back hem up to better match the front. Short bodies and long hems don’t mix all that well. I’ve been having crazy itches to make more tops, especially with Me Made May coming up, and this make was no where near my sewing list but I had to stop everything to make it!

Look out next week for my Fashion Revolution Posts!

 

#RefashionFriday · handmade wardrobe · refashion

#RefashionFriday Oversized Sweater to Top

Happy Spring! Although we got our 4th snow storm this month 2 days ago, the sun is shining and I can actually hear birds chirping! It’s been such a crazy month, but we are finally in the moving process! In just 5 more weeks, we will move into our new home! The past couple weeks have been filled with cleaning, packing, shopping and tying up loose ends.  I’ve been pulled in a few different directions, so apparel sewing was not on my mind. But my creativity needed a huge boost, and this sweater needed a facelift – so I thought we could help each other out.

I bought this sweater at the thrift store a few months ago – mainly for the print. It started as a 1X, but I turned it into between an XS – S. When I first started reading about other refashioners, I was a little shocked by the amount of backlash some bloggers got about buying XL clothes to make smaller. Because it was taking the larger sizes away from those who really needed them. At first it made me rethink my buying, but then I would go to the store and see the same pieces sitting there week after week. No one was buying them, and that’s when I realized sizing was just part of the hunt.

Today’s Refashioning Tip: Any item that you find, and you want, it’s yours! The reality is, that any article taken from the thrift store is saving it – whether you wear it as is or turn it into something new.

I’m fortunate that my petite figure gives me a wide range of sizes to refashion, but even after a shopping trip, there are plenty of pieces left behind! Now a lot of bloggers will recommend buying oversized clothes because it will give you more fabric to work with. And while that’s a great tip, it’s still a good idea to like what you are buying, not just buy because it’s oversized. (The more you like it, the more motivated you are to work with it!)

But now back to this sweater. I wanted a quick refashion. Something easy, but super wearable, with a little more pizazz than just resizing it to fit. Sweater refashions are very common, and there are a million ideas for them on pinterest. One of my favorites is adding another texture to break up the sweater and make it a little less casual.

#RefashionFriday Oversized Sweater to Top - Trish Stitched

Adding coordinating fabric is a great stash buster! I had this black chiffon left over from my Black Tie Wedding Guest Dress, and thankfully it was just enough to gather for the bottom portion of this sweater!

#RefashionFriday Oversized Sweater to Top - Trish Stitched#RefashionFriday Oversized Sweater to Top - Trish Stitched#RefashionFriday Oversized Sweater to Top - Trish Stitched

The first step was to resize the top. I took roughly 3″ in on both sides and removed the arms. The arms were sucked in as well, then reattached. After reattaching the arms, I tried the sweater on to hem the sleeves (about 3″), mark where to cut the sweater body. I wanted the sweater hem to end right around my hips, so I added a half inch to that length (for seam allowance), and cut.

#RefashionFriday Oversized Sweater to Top - Trish Stitched#RefashionFriday Oversized Sweater to Top - Trish Stitched

There are a whole bunch of options when adding a new hem to a top. I decided to make a 5″ extension because anything longer makes me look short. After gathering my chiffon, I attached to the sweater and finished it off with a simple hem. And that’s it! This was a very easy refashion, and just the quick project I needed.

Inspiration: 

My favorite inspiration today comes from Merrick’s Art. She wrote up a great tutorial to make your own chiffon hem top!

merricksart

Another great idea is to layer your hem, which could be fun with different colors or prints. This top from Anthropologie is so pretty!

anthro top

Leave the hem a little longer to create a tunic style top!

tunic

Last thing to share: Do you join Facebook groups? I recently joined a few and love that my news feed is filled with so much sewing! My favorite group so far is Upcycle Sewing. It’s been a great place to get and share ideas, and I totally recommend joining! What are some of your favorite Facebook groups?

Have you done a recent refashion? Send photos and details to trish@trishstitched.com to be featured! And follow along my refashioning finds through Pinterest!

Have a great weekend!

handmade wardrobe · sewing

Denim Kalle Shirt: Extended Cop Top

Really now, where has the month of February gone? It flew by and I didn’t get everything done that I planned on! I’ve mentioned a few times about house hunting and finally moving out of Hoboken, and I don’t want to jinx anything but we think we found the one! I’ll definitely have more details about this soon enough, but for now you can see where my brain is at based on my pinterest boards. I have a whole lot of home ideas going on- with a ton of focus on my future sewing studio!

Because of all the excitement with the house, my personal sewing has not been getting as much attention. But this super cute Kalle top would not stop haunting me, so here she is!

Denim Kalle Shirt: Extended Crop Top - Trish Stitched

I have a slight obsession with Closet Case Patterns because Heather’s patterns are so fitting for my lifestyle. She designs practical patterns that are meant to be wardrobe staples, and the ones I’ve made so far (Bombshell Bathing Suit, Kelly Anorak, Ginger Jeans) have proven their versatility in my closet. I loved Kalle when she came out. She is a super cute pattern that comes with three options: Crop Top, Tunic and Dress. I really wanted to see others versions of Kalle before diving in, because all three of those options were not common pieces in my wardrobe. I would want a regular top version, but didn’t know the best way to design it so I thought eventually I would get inspiration from the sewing community.

Denim Kalle Shirt: Extended Crop Top - Trish StitchedChambray Kalle Shirt: Extended Crop Top - Trish Stitched

Fast forward a few months and everyone is making Kalle. Every time I open Instagram- there’s another version! So I finally caved and bought the pattern. To make it fit my lifestyle, I either had to shorten the tunic or lengthen the crop top. I really love the hem of the crop top, so I decided to go that route.

This is technically a wearable muslin. I’ve had this lightweight denim hanging around for years from another project, and thought a denim version would be good to have. I didn’t have any blue thread, so I went with white and quite like the contrast. I say this is a win in my book. This top is easy to wear, has a cute fit for being ‘oversized’, and after a few washes, will get that worn in feeling of a great piece.

Chambray Kalle Shirt: Extended Crop Top - Trish StitchedChambray Kalle Shirt: Extended Crop Top - Trish StitchedChambray Kalle Shirt: Extended Crop Top - Trish Stitched

The older I get, the fewer patterns I tend to buy. I’ve become very conscious about what’s in my stash and even though Joann’s has those great 5 for $5 pattern days, I realize that just because you have a million patterns to make doesn’t mean you will ever get around to actually making them. (I also have a few patterns from my own stash available on etsy because there is no way I’ll get around to making them!) I’m always on the lookout for basic patterns with options- and Kalle one is loaded with them!

Kalle has three lengths, two front button options, two collar options, and two back options – leaving lots of room to build your perfect style. My version is comprised of View A (full length placket) with a full collar, and back pleat. I cut a size 2 and to extend the crop top into a longer shirt, I added 4″ to each bodice piece at the lengthen line.

Chambray Kalle Shirt: Extended Crop Top - Trish StitchedChambray Kalle Shirt: Extended Crop Top - Trish StitchedChambray Kalle Shirt: Extended Crop Top - Trish Stitched

I’m excited to make more versions, and to finally add mine to the amazing Kalle Shirt Dress posts online! Have you made Kalle? Do you have the sleeve expansion? That may be the next version I have to make..