handmade wardrobe · sewing

Quilted Kelly Anorak

You may have seen this jacket on my instagram a few months ago, but I finally took some photos of it and wanted to share the details from this make!

Back in March I saw a tiktok of a woman wearing a blue quilted jacket with a bomber jacket neckline, and closed with both snaps and a zipper. One day, while in line at Target, I spotted a jacket that looked very similar to what I had been looking for, and sure enough it was the jacket! (Original jacket no longer on Target’s website, but I found a photo of it here) I really wanted to make an ever-so-popular quilted jacket, but I didn’t want to make a jacket from an actual quilt and this inspiration piece was exactly what I was looking for to get started on my own version.

I found the perfect secondhand fabric from A Thrifty Notion, a Sage Cotton Twill, and bought three yards. I had been looking at bomber jacket patterns but couldn’t find anything with the closure details I wanted. The only pattern I knew of (and made before) with the snaps and zipper close was the Kelly Anorak from Closet Core Patterns. Using this pattern would mean I wouldn’t have the same neckline as the inspiration piece, but I was ok with that change.

I previously made View A (view it here), and have used the pattern pieces in several projects over the years. The Kelly Anorak has been one of my favorite patterns, and I really enjoy the sewing process because of the instructions and sew-a-longs that are online. For this version I went with View B, and made different pockets to get a similar look to the inspiration piece.

I measured at a size 4, but cut a size 6 to account for the extra material and batting. It fits perfectly but a little tight in the arms if I were to wear a thick sweater underneath. (Closet Core makes a lining expansion kit for the Kelly with a new sleeve pattern, for those interested).

Going into this make, I knew I didn’t want a jacket with a seperate lining. The idea was to make the quilting on the front and have the interior look like a solid backing. It took much longer, and I removed and re-stitched basting stitches a few times, but I love the finished look.

The quilting was a very long process, and I spend a few days just stitching the body pieces of the jacket. I cut 2x the body and front facing pieces, as well as the sleeve pieces (more detail on this down below!) I cut 1x batting pieces for the body pieces, sleeves and front facings. Since the full back had batting, I didn’t think it was necessary to add more batting to the back facing. (I also added batting to the collar)

I marked the stitching on each piece with an erasable fabric pencil, and basted the batting pieces to each pattern piece. (Also, if you are looking for a fabric pencil, I’ve had the Sewline Mechanical Pencil for years and love it so much! You can get white, black, blue and pink lead.) I wanted to try to match the quilting lines as much as I could, so once one piece was marked out, I matched it up with the next piece to continue the lines. It didn’t work out perfectly, but I did create some pretty side seams.

After the quilting was stitched, I trimmed the batting seam allowances on each piece. This kept the bulk out of my seam finishing’s which helped during construction. Once the pieces were quilted, I basted the “lining” to each piece to create my final fabric. This took a lot of ironing, and a lot of patience at the sewing machine, but once the fabric was complete, the construction of the jacket was straightforward.

I finished my seams as the pattern recommended, with flat felting, (tutorial from Closet Core here).

I didn’t have enough fabric for the sleeve “lining” and I didn’t want them to be too bulky so I took apart an old make for the extra material! I made this raincoat a few years ago but never wore it and moved it into my refashion pile. I had to do a little bit of “franken-stitching” to get the full sleeve piece, but the color and weight of the fabric was perfect for my sleeves!

I only made one size adjustment and that was in sleeve length. I didn’t think about it before cutting and quilting my sleeve, but before attaching the cuff, I realized the sleeve was just a bit too long. Since I already did the construction for my cuffs (out of order on the pattern instructions), and stitched the sleeve to the body, and finished the seam with bias binding, I wasn’t able to alter the length anywhere else but the hemline. Instead of a 5/8″ seam allowance, I sewed the cuff at 1 1/4″. It makes the sleeve extension shorter, but left the sleeve intact.

My hem was finished with binding and hand stitching. And the last step was adding the snaps, which I made Drew hammer because I was terrified of messing them up! Cutting holes in a completed garment is so scary!

I am so proud of this jacket! I’ve already worn it several times, and can’t wait to keep wearing it once the temperatures get back out of the freezing zone!

Quick Links:

Pattern: Closet Core Kelly Anorak: View B, Size 6

Fabric: A Thrifty Notion: Sage Cotton Twill, Secondhand

Hardware: Wawak: Zipper and Snaps

etsy · handbags · handmade wardrobe · refashion · sewing · Tutorials

Jeans to Pinafore Refashion

Hello, hello! In the past few months my apparel sewing has slowed down quite a bit and my bag making as been taking over! I’ve been working hard to add new bags to my Etsy shop, and finally designed and created my dream bag! (I’ll share more at the end of this post!)

But as the title says, my main reason for blogging today is to share my latest refashion! This piece has been several months in the making. I started dreaming about this project back in December! I wanted to share a little of my thought process, because it really was an idea that bounced around a bit before landing! One of the most common questions I get asked is where my ideas come from, so here’s how this one formed!

I had a pair of corduroy pants in my refashion pile, that I was stuck on what to do with. I started looking online for corduroy dresses, or jackets to gather some inspiration. I came across this adorable pinafore from Show Me Your Mumu, and started going down the pinafore rabbit hole!

I do quite a bit of fabric Tetris in my mind when figuring out if I can realistically make a refashion work. I knew if the pants were long enough, and I was able to cut them off with enough fabric to spare, this project would work.

I sat with the idea for a bit (some other projects got in the way of starting) and before I knew it the weather was warming up. I wasn’t motivated to sew with corduroy anymore, but the idea was still taking over in my mind. I started searching on ThredUP to find a replacement garment to bring the idea to life. Thankfully the perfect pair popped up in my search and the project was back on!

I started searching for a pattern for the bodice. (This is something that can be self drafted!) I came across the Amber Pinafore Dress from Named Clothing. I’ve had great luck with Named Patterns in the past so I knew it would be reliable for me. I tested the bodice with cotton fabric before cutting so I could work out any fit issues beforehand.

Now onto the tutorial! Sorry for the photo quality, I realized I was taking more video than photos for this project so some of these are from screenshots.

First, with the jeans on, mark knee length. This was my starting point to cut because I didn’t want to make my skirt too short. (I cut off an additional 2” once I had a better idea of length.)

Seam rip open each cut pant leg, leaving one side seam intact. Undo hem as well.

Cut bodice out of each pant leg. (For a better fit, the top of my bodice lined with the jean hem, and the bottom of the bodice lined up with my original pant cut line.) I traced my bodice piece onto each leg, making sure to match where the Jean seam line was for a consistent look. (Tip: mark on your pattern piece where seams need to hit!) Try to keep the bodice towards the ends of the leg to be sure you get the most use out of your fabric.

Once your bodice is cut, you can see how much fabric you have left to work with.

Next step is to turn the remaining jeans into the skirt. Going back to the top portion of your jeans, seam rip the inner legs.

On the front of the jeans, seam rip the fly section a few inches up, until the jeans can lay flat, and you can see the triangle start to form on the bottom. Don’t seam rip too far up, and don’t hit the fly zipper. This part of the project you may have to play around with a bit to get the right fit. Pin the triangle in place before adding any fabric, and try the skirt on to test the opening width.

Thankfully my front triangle didn’t need much fabric, so only a small portion of my fabric went into this section.

Continue this process for the skirt back as well. Seam rip the center back seam a few inches, and lay back flat. You may have to seam rip more on the back than the front. My opening was wider in the back, and I didn’t have enough material from one pant leg to properly fit. I stitched my remaining fabric together for a bigger insert. You can see I placed my new seam in the center of my insert, which takes extra time to pin and stitch properly, but creates a more finished look. I also folded the pant leg triangle sides in more to create a flatter piece.

The back was a bit harder for me to fit. I recommend pinning in place, then trying the skirt on to be sure it lays nicely.

After the inserts are finished, the rest of the material is for the straps! Now, on my pants, since I cut off an extra 2” from my original pants, I was able to use most of that for my straps. (You may not have that material to work with, but you can always make the back straps out of a coordinating fabric if you don’t have enough!) I had to add some length from my remaining fabric to extend the straps, as you can see with my seam lines.

My entire bodice is lined with cotton muslin. For reference, my straps were cut 2” wide and stitched with a 3/8” seam allowance.

Try your skirt on and pin bodice in place. I started by pinning the front, making sure to get my bodice pieces close to each other. Once front is pinned, pin back straps, making sure straps are comfortably tight. These will be pinned on an angle. Remove pinafore and double check the back straps to make sure their distance is even. If your jeans have belt loops, the back loop is a great center point to measure from. I hand stitched my bodice down, but you can certainly sew by machine.

To finish the skirt, I evened out my hem, serged the edge and hand stitched up 3/8”. I didn’t want to make my skirt any shorter, but this part is all personal preference!

What made this project work: mid-rise jeans. With the type of bodice I added, the waist of my jeans needed to come up, so starting with mid rise jeans meant they didn’t have to come up that much higher. This is something to consider if you want to make this style pinafore yourself, mid rise or high rise jeans would work best. If you have a pair of low rise jeans, you may have to re-fit the waist altogether and may not have enough material for the entire bodice (or you may have to build a different bodice. Search for “overall dresses” for another idea!)

Another tip, if you want more material to work with, use boot cut or flare jeans! My original jeans were technically a “crop pant” but because of my height, they were normal length skinny jean on me.

Want to go a step further? Add a little extra length to the bodice front and strap ends, and make the entire top removable with buttons! I did this for my skirt to overall pinafore refashion a few years back. It’s a great way to get more wear out of the garment! (Post here!)

And a quick note: here are the new bags I’ve been working on! These little crossbody bags have been in the works for years and I’m so incredibly excited with how they turned out! The exteriors are made from reclaimed and secondhand fabrics! Shop Crossbody’s on my Etsy!

handmade wardrobe · sewing

Botanical Myosotis Sheet Dress

For the past year, I’ve been obsessing over the “botanical” print t-shirts (like this one from Wholesome Culture) and started a search for one of my own. Last year they weren’t available secondhand since the style was still pretty new, so I turned my search to botanical print fabric, in hopes to recreate my own t-shirt. I came across this amazing bed sheet on Mercari, and when it arrived, the print was larger than I was expecting, so I thought it would look much better in dress form, to be able to show off more of the print.

I was going to wait until Spring to start this dress, but I kept seeing the fabric sitting in my sewing studio, and just couldn’t wait any longer! It is completely seasonally inappropriate but I had the motivation to make it so I went for it!

I decided to go with the Myosotis Dress pattern from Deer and Doe Patterns. It’s a silhouette that I think suits me well, and I really love the tiered skirt. I made Myosotis last summer out of fabric I bought in Paris two years ago, and love that dress! (I never got around to blogging it but I posted a photo over on Instagram.)

I made version A, without the sleeve ruffle. I tested the sleeve ruffle on my first Myosotis and wasn’t really in love with the look, so I kept it off of this version as well. I had a lot of fun with print placement on this dress, and since the florals were pretty big, I wanted to be sure they were showcased, and the different colors were sprawled all over the dress, not just stacked (i.e; yellow on bodice directly on top of yellow in skirt). I put some of my favorite florals on the bodice so the gathering wouldn’t disrupt the design. I loved the floral names on the sheet (one of the reasons I love the botanical shirts!) however I wasn’t able to keep all of them with all the florals, because of the seamlines, but they are sprinkled throughout so the detail I love is still incorporated in the dress.

The bodice is fully lined, but I didn’t line the skirt. This dress pattern doesn’t call for lining, so all seams are visible inside. I didn’t want to play around with adding a separate lining so before sewing, I lined each bodice piece. It is actually lined with old muslins, and whatever larger pieces I could find in my stash, so the back is lined with white and the front bodice is lined with natural muslin. A little patchworked but I wanted to use what I had! I also chose not to line the sleeves, so it looks a little strange from the inside.

I was thinking about lining the skirt but I would line it with cotton and I feel every time I line a dress with cotton, it gets static-y or clumpy and doesn’t fall properly. I have the option of removing the skirt and stitching each tier with lining before sewing them together, but I’m just not sure it is necessary. If anyone has any suggestions – I’m open to hear them!

A few more details on this dress include a couple of gold buttons from my vintage button stash and POCKETS!

A few notes on the pattern: I cut a size 38, and made no changes to the bodice or sleeves. This is a looser fitting dress, so while I could have sized down, the dress would have been harder to get over my head. This is one of the reasons I added the waist ties, so I could cinch in my waist a bit. I did cut down the skirt length to fit my shorter legs better. I made the tier skirt option and made the top tier 12″, cutting off about 1 5/8″. I left the length on the bottom tier. My total skirt length came to just over 19″ (with a 1/2″ hem). For reference, my inseam to the floor is 27″. Since this version is meant to be above the knee I didn’t have to alter too much, but if you are taller and looking to make this dress, that’s something you may want to note.

The botanical prints have become pretty popular and a google search produced multiple fabric options, as well as sheets. There are some stunning prints available on Spoonflower that you can get in cotton, although it can be expensive (and the mushroom fabric on Spoonflower is adorable!).

If you are on the lookout for some secondhand floral print sheets, I highly recommend checking sites like Etsy, Poshmark and Mercari. I have had luck at a few thrift stores for sheets (my favorite spot closed down due to COVID) but the more that people have been searching for secondhand sheets, the more there are being sold – it has become a huge selling niche in the secondhand market, much like quilts! Some keywords are “botanical” and “vintage floral”, these terms may help with results. Pricing can get insanely high, especially with name brand bedding, but with a little time spent searching, you can find a great deal – and with Poshmark and Mercari, you are able to offer a lower price.

The very last detail to share on this dress is the addition of one of my new labels! I was gifted these from Dutch Label Shop, and intend to use them for my handmade bags but this label is also the perfect finishing touch on this dress!

These labels are simply stunning. I’ve purchased from Dutch Label Shop before and am always happy with the quality, but this label goes above and beyond anything I was expecting. It is so cool to see my little logo on a label – and I am so, so happy to sew with them! (If you are looking to get labels for your handmade wardrobe or products, check out Dutch Label Shop and use trishstitched15% at checkout for 15% off!)

Have a wonderful Sunday!

handmade wardrobe · refashion · sewing

Floral Tablecloth Lander Pants

I’ve had so many projects this year that haven’t worked out. There are a whole bunch of reasons why; using the wrong pattern or the wrong fabrics, rushing projects or starting and losing motivation to finish, the reasons seem endless.

I wanted a project that had a good chance of working out. I wanted something fun and inspiring and not too difficult to make. I also wanted to use this tablecloth I just picked up on Poshmark! In my quest for using sustainable fabric and secondhand sources, I’ve been looking on sites like Poshmark and Mercari for tablecloths and sheets. I saw this piece on Posh but didn’t make a plan for it until it arrived. A tablecloth can have a pretty broad range of feel, and even if it says 100% cotton, there’s a chance of it being thicker, thinner, etc. This tablecloth was a great, medium weight, almost canvas like but a little lighter.

I decided to make a pair of pants and landed on the Lander Pants! I’ve made Lander Shorts before and they come together pretty easily, and I really like the fit so I knew these were just about fool-proof.

I am a skinny jean lover. I used to wear boot cut jeans growing up, but once the skinny jean trend started, I never stopped wearing them! But I like getting out of my comfort zone a little bit – like I did with this jumpsuit – and thought making a pair of lander pants would be fun!

My last pair of Lander Shorts were made in a size 2, so I made the pants in the size 2 as well. The size 2 fits really well in my hips, but has the slightest gap in the back waist. This happens with all of my pants and jeans, and honestly I just haven’t taken the time to figure out how to solve that problem. It isn’t a big deal, and I almost always wear a belt with whatever bottoms I’m wearing, but I wanted to mention it anyway.

I also really love the button fly on these pants. I used to dislike installing jean buttons on anything – jeans, jackets, etc. I was using the Dritz jean buttons because they were convenient to purchase but they were really difficult for me to install. Every time I hammered, the tops would bend, or the screw would bend making my buttons lopsided. Since I started buying a lot more supplies online this year, like my needles, I also started branching out for other supply options. I came across jean buttons from Wawak Sewing and couldn’t believe how great they came out! Just wanted to share that option for anyone else facing a similar issue!

I followed the instructions for the hem, but wound up cutting off 3″ from the bottom before folding up the final hem. For my petite friends – I’m 4’10” and cut the pattern for the ankle fit. I love these pants with flats, and I also really like them with ankle boots and heels, although I won’t wear these with them as often! These pants are bright and bold but they pair well with so many of the basics in my wardrobe – they fit right into my closet!

handmade wardrobe · Make Nine · sewing

Summer Floral Rumi Tank Dress

It has been some time since I’ve shared a finished project! And it certainly has been awhile since I finished something. I’ve actually been doing a lot of sewing, but a lot of projects  haven’t worked out. Since I’ve had a few fails, I needed something easy, quick and “fail proof”.

If there’s one thing I’ve been wanting in my wardrobe for years it’s been simple “throw on and go” dresses in summer. I thought I found it a few years ago in the Ebony Dress from Closet Case Patterns – and while I love this pattern, it isn’t as perfect as a dress for me (the top fits well but the dress is a little too flowy). I’ve had my eye on the Rumi Tank Dress from Christine Haynes for a year! I actually found it while searching for a replacement for my favorite summer dress that got a huge stain on. This pattern features a fitted tent silhouette, with a racer back and a separate hem band.

I took a trip to the new Fab Scrap store in Manhattan last month with the intention of finding fabric to make the Rumi Tank Dress and scored this awesome bright pink floral print! Typically pink is not my color – but it’s been growing on me over the years. I snagged two yards of it and went to work on my Rumi.

Summer Floral Rumi Tank Dress - Trish Stitched

Rumi sizing made me a little nervous. I’m used to sewing a bigger size in commercial sewing patterns (I can range between a 6-8) but in indie patterns I usually cut a 0 or 2. I cut a size 6 in Rumi. Mostly because my fabric didn’t have as much stretch, but any smaller and the top would have been fairly tight. The only adjustment I made was in the dress length. To make it a little more petite friendly, I cut 2″ off the dress, but left the hem band the same length. This made it perfectly above the knee!

Summer Floral Rumi Tank Dress - Trish StitchedSummer Floral Rumi Tank Dress - Trish StitchedSummer Floral Rumi Tank Dress - Trish Stitched

Construction of this dress is quick – the longest step was attaching the neck and arm bindings! At first I thought the neckline would come too low, but it’s actually flattering where it falls. If you do want a higher neckline, that isn’t a hard adjustment to make.

Summer Floral Rumi Tank Dress - Trish StitchedSummer Floral Rumi Tank Dress - Trish Stitched

This fabric is beautiful. I don’t have an exact content, but it’s similar to a stretch cotton, with a little more weight. I had enough fabric for the hem but it would have more seam lines. I had some fabric from my Fab Scrap Yard Pack I bought awhile back, and it perfectly matched the dress!

I really love this pattern, and am excited to make more versions. I love that I can throw on a sports bra, sandals and this dress and look put together. I’m also looking forward to making some tank versions. Now that I know it’s a good fit, it’ll be easy to make a few for casual wear and a few for running! And I’m pretty happy to cross another make off my Make Nine List!

Summer Floral Rumi Tank Dress - Trish Stitched

Shop Fab Scrap HERE

Shop Rumi Tank HERE

handmade wardrobe

Lander Shorts & Ebony Tee with Measure Fabric

It has been a while since my last post, but I’m back today with a fun project I’ve been wanting to make! Today I’m sharing my third post with Measure Fabric and I’m so in love with this outfit!

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A few years ago I got rid of all my high school shorts that were just too short to wear, but have been very slow to replace them in my wardrobe. I’ve been getting picky about the pieces I bring in my closet, but shorts is an area I was getting desperate in. So when I spotted this light blue bull denim on Measure’s site, I knew it was time to dig into a new pair!

It took a few hours of research to decide on a pattern. I wanted a pair of shorts that focused on a button front, had belt loops and felt petite crotch friendly. I was deciding between a few options: Closet Case Jenny Shorts, Megan Nielsen Dawn Shorts and the Lander Shorts by True Bias. I went with Lander because I would have to do a lot of hacking to Jenny and Dawn looked like it had a longer crotch.

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I made a size 2 in Lander, with no adjustments! I’ve been playing around with the length on these, and while I love the regular length, I also love the shorts rolled up once more! However, while they look cute rolled up in the front, the back pocket hangs a little too low to look as cute in the back, so for my next pair, I’ll keep that in mind!

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This denim was a dream to sew. There is no stretch so it’s great for structured bottoms, it would look so beautiful in a summer skirt! While I am normally a dark denim girl, I love the addition of light denim.

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When it comes to denim, it is SO important to buy quality fabric, and I’ve learned my lesson on a few past projects. Both pairs of jeans I made were created with fabric that was on the cheaper side rather than the quality side. While my first pair is still holding up because I barely wear them, my second pair definitely went downhill after a short time because the quality wasn’t the best. If I had chosen to use better denim, I would still be able to wear them.

A little surprise I put into these shorts: a fabric napkin from my Grandma’s house became the pocket lining!

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For the second part of my outfit, I made another Ebony Tee from Closet Case Patterns! I love this pattern so much, I think this is my fifth version. I made View C, the raglan sleeve out of this gorgeous Rebecca Taylor floral knit. This pattern comes together so quickly – it was nice to stitch up to get back into sewing apparel after my short break.

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When it comes to knit fabric, I get very cautious. I’ve had some bad knits, some that are just so thin or don’t sew well. But this knit is fantastic! It is so soft, it feels like it’s been washed 100 times. It’s a lighter weight, making it great for a top, but not transparent so no need for lining or wearing a camisole underneath. My serger and sewing machine also loved it, so it was a very happy project!

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I am so excited about both of these makes and think they will be staples in my summer wardrobe!

Measure Fabric:

Denim

Floral

#RefashionFriday · handmade wardrobe · refashion · sewing · Tutorials

#RefashionFriday Skirt to Pinafore Refashion

Happy Friday! I have a whole list of sewing projects to get to, and with Spring finally peaking out from the winter weather, I’m so motivated to tackle some new projects!

I picked this skirt up a few weeks ago, while filming my thrifting trip for my Simplicity takeover. I originally wasn’t going to buy it, but it looked like it would actually fit me ‘as is’ and that excited me. It was also this gorgeous golden color, and looked to be of really great quality.

I got the skirt home, tried it on, and had to suck it in for it to button! Thankfully it was a button close and I had plenty of room to move the buttons over for a more relaxing fit. The skirt looked very frumpy on me, as most maxi skirts do. Originally, I was considering making a knee length skirt and calling it a day, but about 5 minutes later, I had the idea to create a pinafore. Maybe it was because I kept seeing the #SewBibs challenge on instagram, but the thought of a pinafore just clicked! Since I wasn’t sure just how often I would wear a pinafore, I thought I would take this project a step further and make the bib removable.

#RefashionFriday Skirt to Pinafore - Trish Stitched

Overall this project was a simple transformation, and I was able to use my Turia Dungaree pattern from Pauline Alice to help with the top.

#RefashionFriday Skirt to Pinafore - Trish Stitched#RefashionFriday Skirt to Pinafore - Trish Stitched#RefashionFriday Skirt to Pinafore - Trish Stitched

I will have a video tutorial coming up, and will update the post once it’s completed! But for right now, I’ll break down some of the steps.

Update: Here’s the video!

First, chop the bottom off. Mark where you would like a hem to go – and add in some seam allowance. The more you cut off, the longer your bib can be. Since my skirt fell on my high waist, that meant my bib could be shorter, and I chopped about 9″ off the bottom.

#RefashionFriday Skirt to Pinafore - Trish Stitched#RefashionFriday Skirt to Pinafore - Trish Stitched#RefashionFriday Skirt to Pinafore - Trish Stitched

My favorite trick with this refashion was using the original skirt hem in two different places! I used it as the finished top of my bib and I was able to use the rest in the straps. The original hem was pretty wide, so by adding some extra seam allowance, I was able to keep the original fold.

To make the top removable, I added buttonholes to the bottom of the bib and the ends of the straps. Buttons were sewn onto the skirt itself, so the pieces could easily be attached and removed.

#RefashionFriday Skirt to Pinafore - Trish Stitched#RefashionFriday Skirt to Pinafore - Trish Stitched

During the making of this refashion, I was getting really annoyed. About halfway through, I looked at the piece and it reminded me of an apron. I stepped away for a bit, but even after returning, I couldn’t get the apron vibes out of my head. Before quitting for the night, I took out a pack of dungaree metal strap pieces and pinned them to the straps. Adding in the overall straps and separating the straps from the top made a huge difference and I no longer saw an apron!

That wasn’t part of the original plan, but it was definitely a detail I was happy to add.

#RefashionFriday Skirt to Pinafore - Trish Stitched

After the top was finished, I completed the project by hemming the skirt! I was so happy with how this refashion turned out, and it was made so much easier by using a pattern I already had! There are so many dungaree and pinafore patterns in the sewing world, here’s so inspo to make your own!

Tilly & the Buttons Cleo

and Tilly & the Buttons Mila 

Closet Case Patterns Jenny Overalls

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Seamwork Magazine Dani Pinafore

Dani Pinafore

Simplicity Knit Overalls (I have this pattern and can’t wait to make it!)

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McCall’s Overalls (this comes with pants and pinafore!)

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Inspired to make your own Bib pattern? Check out the #SewBibs competition over on instagram! I follow Meg from Cookin’ & Craftin’ on insta and she’s been sharing loads of inspiration. Here’s her blog post! The challenge is on until April 12th, so you still have time to work on your makes!

handmade wardrobe · Make Nine · sewing

Measure Fabric Lounge Wear Set

Hello, hello! I feel like I haven’t blogged in so long! I have an exciting project to share that I finished a few weeks ago. I feel like I have so much to share that I’ve been sharing over on Instagram but not here.

The first thing: I’m a Measure Maker! For the next few months, I will be sharing a project made with fabric from Measure: A Fabric Parlor. My first project with them is something on my Make Nine! I chose to work with this amazing White and Grey Abstract Double Knit Ponte. It has this beautiful feel, the white part is slightly risen and super soft. It’s very stretchy, but thick, as ponte typically is. What I really love, besides the unique print of this fabric, is that the wrong side is the perfect contrast and it helped me in making the details on my new lounge wear.

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I’ve been seeing these lounge wear sets just about everywhere I look lately. First I thought they were a trend with teens, but when Anthropologie came out with their sets, I knew I had to try it out. It felt like this project magically came together. I got the perfect fabric from Measure, and I had a lounge wear pattern on my Make Nine: the Hudson Pants. For this look, I made my first pair of Hudson Pants, and a hacked version of Seamwork Skipper.

Lounge Wear Set with Measure Fabric - Trish StitchedLounge Wear Set with Measure Fabric - Trish StitchedLounge Wear Set with Measure Fabric - Trish StitchedLounge Wear Set with Measure Fabric - Trish StitchedLounge Wear Set with Measure Fabric - Trish Stitched

I can’t believe it took me this long to make Hudson. When they first came out, I was seeing them everywhere, and I thought they were cute, but not my style. After seeing the different variations over the years, they really grew on me and I needed to try them out.

I made all the pant details out of the “wrong side” of the fabric, the pant cuffs, the waistband and pocket edges. I really love how the look of it came out. These pants are so comfortable and they are perfect for an after workout look, or just a great pair to lounge around in.

Lounge Wear Set with Measure Fabric - Trish Stitched

The matching top is made from a very cropped Seamwork Skipper! I was actually hoping to make the hood, which is why I chose Skipper, but wound up not having enough fabric for it. I wanted to follow through and use the wrong side of the fabric for the details on the sweatshirt as well, so the cuffs, bottom band and neck band are all made from the wrong side.

Lounge Wear Set with Measure Fabric - Trish StitchedLounge Wear Set with Measure Fabric - Trish StitchedLounge Wear Set with Measure Fabric - Trish Stitched

I loooove the set together. It is so comfortable and fun. I can wear the pieces separately or together, but I probably wouldn’t wear the sweatshirt without the pants unless I get some high waisted pants (which is another item on my make list!)

Details on my makes:

Hudson Pants: Size 0, View A, no changes

Seamwork Skipper: Size XS, Cropped.

Fabric: Abstract Grain Double Knit Ponte from Measure. 

I will definitely be making another pair of Hudson’s, I already have the fabric. I want to make another Skipper, hopefully one with a hood!

Second piece of news, that I totally forgot to post about last week: I did a Simplicity Instagram Takeover! Simplicity reached out to me a few months back about working together, and I took over their Instagram for the week talking about Refashioning!

I do have all the videos saved and I’m hoping to put them together so anyone can watch it whenever. I talked about my tips for refashioning. Where I get inspiration from, how I find pieces in thrift stores to refashion, etc. I also shared a new refashion! I’ll be doing a whole blog post about this hopefully soon, but here’s the final look!

Trish Stitched

I’ve already received my second round of fabric from Measure, and have a project in mind so I’m excited to start working on that! Happy Spring!

handmade wardrobe · sewing

Mustard Ebony Tee

Do you ever get cravings? Usually the kind of cravings I get are food related and involve diet coke or french fries. But for the last few months I’ve had a craving to make an Ebony Tee by Closet Case Patterns. It’s a pretty peculiar craving for me, because usually I find a pattern I want to make and just make it. But I could not find the right fabric to make my Ebony. After multiple trips to JoAnn’s, and constantly looking in my own stash, I thought I would come across something that would fill my desire for a new Ebony. Thankfully, I finally came across a piece of fabric to fit the bill.

A few weeks ago, my mom and I went to TexWorld, which is a fabric show at the Javits Center in New York. I went to search for fabric for a new project, but it just so happened that my favorite fabric “store” had a booth with fabric for sale! I was able to pick up five different fabric cuts from Fab Scrap– one perfect for an ebony tee!

I’ve talked about Fab Scrap before, but for those who don’t know, Fab Scrap is a company that retrieves unwanted materials and fabric scraps from fashion companies who are looking for a more economical way to recycle them. They sell yardage and larger scraps to individuals like you and me, or to small companies who are looking to be more sustainable in their production! They have a warehouse in Brooklyn, where you can shop all their fabric, or volunteer to sort fabrics, and they do small pop-ups around the New York/New Jersey area. And… not saying it’s official but… they are looking into opening up an LA location! But in the meantime – you can shop online!

Anyway, back to Ebony. It’s the perfect pattern for me. I’ve actually made 4 versions now- two unblogged, and love this pattern more each time I make it. This is my third cropped Ebony. I usually add between 1.5″ – 2″ to the cropped version, to make it the perfect length.

Mustard Ebony Tee - Trish Stitched

The piece I got from Fab Scrap is similar in weight to a scuba knit, without the scuba texture. It has this beautiful floral burnout that was what really gave me all the “heart eyes” for this material.

Mustard Ebony Tee - Trish StitchedMustard Ebony Tee - Trish StitchedMustard Ebony Tee - Trish Stitched

Since the fabric was reclaimed, it wasn’t a clean cut, so I had to do a little tweaking to fit the pattern pieces just right. I had to take out a little bit of the body from both the front and back, and 1/4″ from the 3/4″ sleeves. Since I cut a size larger than I typically cut in patterns, taking a little of the angle out of the sides didn’t change the shape much.

Mustard Ebony Tee - Trish Stitched

Specs for this top:

I made View A, Cropped, with 3/4″ sleeves and an added 1.5″ in length. I made size 4. The sleeves are a little tight because I couldn’t cut them on grain properly, so the stretch is going the wrong way, but it doesn’t bother me.

(You can get the pattern here)

Here’s my total haul from Fab Scrap – and a close up of this mustard!

Mustard Ebony Tee - Trish StitchedMustard Ebony Tee - Trish Stitched

This top is the epitome of my style- and a great basic to add to my wardrobe (yes, I consider it a basic because it is a solid color!). I love wearing skinny jeans and a flowy, or larger, top. I feel put together, and comfortable at the same time, and I am so happy to have another Ebony to add to my collection.

Have you had any pattern cravings? What have you been dying to make?

handmade wardrobe · Make Nine

Make Nine 2019

Happy New Year! I hope everyone had a wonderful holiday season! I still have a few Christmas projects to share but in the spirit of the new year, I wanted to share some more of my sewing plans!

I’m not great with resolutions – but I do like the motivation of the new year, and imagine life with a fresh start come January.

For the past few years, I’ve seen the Make Nine movement online, but never thought I could commit to something like that because I get very easily sidetracked by new patterns and pretty fabrics. However, I’ve had some of the same patterns on my “make list” for years, and it’s about time I put a plan into action to make them happen.

For those that aren’t familiar, it’s a challenge started by Rochelle from Lucky Lucille who writes, “This is a gentle challenge. It’s not one that you can fail. It’s meant to be flexible, a tool you can use to evaluate your motivations and needs for working towards specific things as the year goes on. This is meant to be a challenge focused on learning more about yourself and your making habits while achieving goals. Work at your own pace and join in at any time. – That’s it!”

 

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So here’s my Make Nine! It is pretty general, and open to change, but I think that will help me keep focus on making what I really need.

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1. Bralettes and undergarments in general.

I find myself wearing more relaxed styles of bras, and love everything without underwires. I bought a simple bra a few months ago and it’s my absolute favorite! I’m on a mission to find the perfect pattern to recreate it so I can make a whole bunch!

(This one from Sophie Hines is adorable, and looks great for using up scraps!)

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2. Hudson Pants and Loungewear.

The hudson pants have been on my list for years. I have the fabric to make a pair, I just need to buy the pattern. Again, I’m hoping to make more than one, especially if the style suits me.

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3. Running Shorts.

I’ve been on the hunt for the perfect pair of running shorts, and was tempted to make my own pattern awhile back, but found the perfect shorts pattern in the Moxi Compression Shorts! Now I just have to find the perfect fabric and make a bunch!

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4. Formal Dress.

Drew and I have three weddings to attend this year, 4 weddings including our own. I won’t be making three separate dresses, but I would like to make a new one. I’ve always loved Colette Myrna, but still not convinced the silhouette would work for me on top. So this pattern is still TBD, but it’s on the list!

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5. Short Sleeve & Long Sleeve Tops.

I absolutely need basics. And for years I’ve wanted to invest time into making a set of basics but it can seem like really boring sewing. My goal with this is to make shirts from all reclaimed fabrics. I’m hoping to find the perfect jerseys from places like Fab Scrap, to keep my sewing more eco friendly.

(I already have the Lark Tee pattern, so this is on the list!)

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6. Ginger Jeans. 

I’ve made three pairs, but haven’t made a new pair in years. It’s time for more handmade jeans!

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7. My Wedding Dress.

This pattern is still totally up in the air. I love this Leanne Marshall dress, but I’m still undecided if this is the direction I want to go.

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8. Summer Casual Dress.

I had a favorite dress that I would wear constantly in the summer. It was light and airy but throw it on and it looked like I put effort into my outfit. I want a summer wardrobe filled with dresses like this, and Rumi by Christine Haynes is the perfect pattern.

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9. Swimsuit/Outerwear

This is a little bit of a free sew for me. Depending on timing, and what I can realistically accomplish, I either want to make a new swimsuit or a new coat. I’ve been wanting to make a swimsuit inspired by one my grandma had but lost the photo to find the perfect fabric. I also need a new coat, but I don’t have a specific pattern in mind. With all that’s going on this year, I’m not sure if I will have time to complete #9, but I’m putting it on the list just in case.

(Sophie Swimsuit pictured here)

Of course I will be doing more than just these projects, and I do have refashions to add into the mix, but it’s exciting to think what my wardrobe will look like a year from now!

Are you participating in Make Nine?