refashion · sewing · Tutorials

Shower Curtain Lounge Pants – Free Pattern From Trevor Loves Mommy!

Melissa is a talented blogger over at Trevor Loves Mommy, you may know some of her awesome refashions (like this top and this dress), and she recently came out with a pajama pants pattern – that’s free! (Sign up for her email list and the PDF will be sent to your inbox!) I absolutely love free patterns and love telling people about really great ones. I’m so excited to share this pattern with you!

For some reason, pajama pants are not a popular project in my sewing, which is weird because I actually need more pairs. I have one pair of flannel pants and one pair of cotton pants. Both pairs were gifted to me from my mom and I wear one or the other at least twice a week. Elastic waist pants are comfortable to wear, and so simple to make!

I’ve been getting really inspired by border prints lately and working border prints into apparel. There was one piece of material in my home that had a beautiful border print that I thought would shine on these pants; our basement shower curtain! We don’t use the basement bathroom much and I really bought this shower curtain with the intention to one day use it for a sewing project. It lasted two years before I took it down! The shower curtain came from World Market, and is a cotton/poly mix.

To use the border print, I wanted to be sure I didn’t have to hem the pants after cutting, so I made a toile first. This pattern comes in sizes XS-2XL and the pattern suggestion is to cut out your RTW pattern for pajamas (XS for me), but the pattern also includes sizing – and finished inseam! The inseam measurement helped me with cutting down the pattern for my short legs! On the pant “shorten or lengthen” line I removed 3” to start. After finishing my toile, I also removed 3” from the bottom hemline of the pattern. This way, I was able to keep the original hem on my shower curtain.

The only other change I made to the pattern was my elastic waistband. The pattern shows a single elastic waist, but I wanted a little more detail to mimic some of the RTW lounge pants I’ve been seeing. This is a really easy change; here’s a short tutorial! (Please note, I did not have to add any length to the waist, and elastic I used was 1/2″.)

Right after cutting the pants pattern out, serge or zig zag the raw edge of the waist. From the top of the waistband measure and mark 2.5” down.

Iron the serged edge down, and iron down on the 2.5” mark. Sew the pants together as instructed.

Once pants are stitched, turn the waistband down and stitch as follows: Leave a 3” gap on the back and first stitch the top 5/8” down. Next top stitch the bottom down. You may need to stretch the fabric a bit to fit evenly, but it fits. Next, stitch two more channels 5/8” from the top stitching line. I found it best to go in this order, but stitching the bottom down first also works well.

Once all three lines are stitched, feed elastic into each channel and stitch ends of elastic together. Once all elastic is in, stitch the 3” gap closed, and your pants are done!

This pattern was great to sew. The fit is awesome and it is so easy to cut length out for shorter legs. The instructions are detailed and clear, it is very apparent how much time was spent making this pattern! Not only is this a quick and easy sewing project, it is also a great pattern for beginners or if you are teaching someone to sew!

Get the pattern HERE!

Here’s a short video tutorial as well – yes, I joined TikTok!

{This post is sponsored by Trevor Loves Mommy, as always, all opinions are my own.}

#RefashionFriday · refashion · sewing

#RefashionFriday Colorful Stripe Dress to Shorts Refashion

This refashion was intended to be blogged a few Friday’s ago during Fashion Revolution Week but day the just got away from me! If you follow me over on instagram, you will have already seen this refashion – but I wanted to share a few details here about it!

#RefashionFriday Colorful Stripe Dress to Shorts Refashion - Trish Stitched

I picked this dress up at one of my local thrift stores (weeks before lockdown started) with full intentions of upcycling it. I fell in love with the colors and stripes, and really loved the fabric. It was well loved, but still in good condition – making the fabric that perfect washed and worn feel. I didn’t know what to do with the dress at first, but knew there weren’t too many options because it was a pretty short dress! (This dress is size S, brand is Soda Pop. Based on fit and style, I’m guessing it is a junior department dress.)

#RefashionFriday Colorful Stripe Dress to Shorts Refashion - Trish Stitched#RefashionFriday Colorful Stripe Dress to Shorts Refashion - Trish Stitched

A fabric like this screams summer, and the first piece of clothing that comes to my mind when thinking summer is shorts. Now yes, my wardrobe also needs like, basic denim shorts, but a pair of colorful shorts would be a welcomed addition to my wardrobe! Since this fabric was so bright and fun, I wanted my shorts pattern to be a little fun as well. I used the Paperbag Waist Shorts from Peppermint Magazine for this refashion and cut a  size 8 (the pattern is free, but donate if you can!)

#RefashionFriday Colorful Stripe Dress to Shorts Refashion - Trish Stitched#RefashionFriday Colorful Stripe Dress to Shorts Refashion - Trish Stitched

This was a refashion that required me to seam rip almost the entire garment. I removed the bodice and straps, and removed the front pockets. I seam ripped open one side of the skirt to work with the material, and let down the hem.

#RefashionFriday Colorful Stripe Dress to Shorts Refashion - Trish Stitched#RefashionFriday Colorful Stripe Dress to Shorts Refashion - Trish Stitched#RefashionFriday Colorful Stripe Dress to Shorts Refashion - Trish Stitched#RefashionFriday Colorful Stripe Dress to Shorts Refashion - Trish Stitched

In order for the shorts to fit on the fabric, I had to cut the pattern in half before tracing it onto my fabric, and piece together the fabric. Had the skirt been a little longer, or fuller (gathered or pleated skirt) I probably wouldn’t have had to do this. This part was frustrating, because I thought the pattern would fit without issue, and I needed to re-think my cutting. (If you have to cut a pattern piece in half, don’t forget to include seam allowance where the pieces meet!)

#RefashionFriday Colorful Stripe Dress to Shorts Refashion - Trish Stitched

I was able to use the dress bodice for the new waistband (along with a little extra from skirt leftovers). This pattern has you insert elastic and a little fake tie in the front so I used one of the dress straps for a tie! I also re-purposed the front pockets into back pockets! For the shorts front pockets and hem facings, I used a light pink cotton that was in my stash.

#RefashionFriday Colorful Stripe Dress to Shorts Refashion - Trish Stitched#RefashionFriday Colorful Stripe Dress to Shorts Refashion - Trish Stitched

#RefashionFriday Colorful Stripe Dress to Shorts Refashion - Trish Stitched

I really love these shorts! I think I made them a little too early in the year but by the time summer rolls around they will be getting a lot of wear!

fashion revolution · sewing

Reclaimed, Deadstock & Vintage Fabric Resources

As you can tell from reading my blog – I love fabric. But over the years I’ve been very conscious about where my fabric is coming from, and what I’m bringing into my stash. Yes I love refashioning, but I also love buying a gorgeous piece of fabric I don’t have to think about fitting a pattern on. Fabric buying can be very easy, and overwhelming; there are so many options out there – from cheap to very expensive. But the more you question content and the process of making it, fabric buying can get difficult.

This list is focusing on reclaimed, deadstock and vintage textiles. There are many shops that offer sustainably made fabrics, but I know how difficult it can be to find reclaimed materials and these are the sources I get asked about the most!

Reclaimed, Deadstock and Vintage Fabric Resources- Trish Stitched

Here are some terms I look for and what they mean:

Reclaimed: The technical definition of “reclaim” is: “recover (waste material) for reuse; recycle.” (From Oxford Dictionary)

My definition in terms of fabric being reclaimed is: textiles that have been previously discarded and are being saved from landfill, burning or other forms of destruction. This can be leftover textiles from designers or fabric stores.

Recycled: There are a few definitions of Recycled Fabrics including: “textilessorted, graded and reused again to make fabrics for different end uses.” (Vivify Textiles) Such as, using plastic bottles to create new activewear textiles. (When fabric shopping, this term is more often used when describing newly made textiles)

For me, recycled fabrics can also refer to refashioning, or taking a pre-existing textile (clothing, sheet, curtain, etc) and transforming it into something new.

Deadstock: Technical definition: “an amount of a product that a company has bought or made but is unable to sell.” (Cambridge Dictionary.)

In textile terms, deadstock can also refer to leftover fabric that may have defects, and is typically sold off to smaller companies. (Deadstock can sometimes be destroyed through burning or be sent to landfill.) Deadstock is becoming a very popular term in fabric and clothing buying, and if you would to read more about Deadstock, check out this post from Virtue & Vice.

Vintage: Vintage is a generic term for fabric originating from a previous era.

Many people have their own definitions for how old something has to be, to be considered vintage. Usually it is fabric that is 20-30 years old and older. Materials usually become “antique” after 100 years. There is also fabric sold as Deadstock Vintage, another term to look out for when shopping.

Destash: “To remove yarn, fabric, equipment from one’s collection.”  (Your Dictionary)

Destashing is very popular in the sewing world and there are many people who clean out their stashes online in hopes of re-homing their materials. Buying destashed fabric is a great way to get second-hand materials at a lower cost.

Thrifted: “Items bought at a thrift store, flea market, garage sale, or a shop of a charitable organization.” (Definitions.net)

This term can sometimes be used when shopping fabrics, but oftentimes it may fall under the reclaimed, deadstock or recycled label. This phrasing is typically up to the seller to use instead of those previously listed, but still a term to look out for.

And here’s the list!

Deadstock, Reclaimed, and Destashed Fabric: 

Fab Scrap: (USA, NY) My #1 resource for reclaimed fabric. They work with designers to sell/recycle their excess or unusable materials to avoid textiles going to landfill. Located in New York, they have a warehouse where you can buy fabric by the pound and a shop in Manhattan which is a little more curated and fabric is bought by the yard. They also sell some stock and mixed boxes online and they have “insta-sales” on instagram. Fab Scrap also accepts remnants/scraps from sewers to recycle but it will cost $1.50/lb to recycle. (It then gets turned into shoddy, which is a product containing mixed recycled fibers, great for stuffing!)

Queen of Raw: (Global) A marketplace where vendors can sell their deadstock materials. A great place for purchasing large amounts of material for clothing lines, etc. They also offer fabrics in 3 yard minimums for smaller purchases. Located in New York but has sellers all over the world.

FabCycle: (Canada, Vancouver) FabCycle works with designers, factories and schools to collect unused textiles to avoid textile waste from entering landfills. This includes scraps, off cuts, deadstock and end of rolls. Shop online or visit their ReUse Center in Vancouver where they also take fabric donations! You can also shop FABCYCLE on Etsy!

A Thrifty Notion: (USA, KS) A shop that offers deadstock, vintage, and destashed fabrics! They take in a lot of donated materials that other sewers no longer want and sell online and in store. They also offer a “friday feature” of “new” materials in store. They also put together a fantastic Thrift Store Locator List featuring many “Re-use” shops, where you can donate materials and notions locally.

Stonemountain & Daughters Fabric: (USA, CA) Stonemountain is a fabric shop with an impressive collection of fabrics, and they have an online section exclusively for Deadstock Fabrics which are left over from garment factories and textile mills. While writing this, they even offer deadstock activewear fabric!

Measure: A Fabric Parlor: (USA, GA) Measure Fabrics offers mostly deadstock fabrics, which are available in limited quantities. I personally love Measure Fabrics and they often do fabric features on Instagram as well!

Swanson’s Fabrics: (USA, MA) Swanson’s Fabrics is a thrift store for fabric and crafting supplies. They offer upholstery, classes, and incredibly affordable fabrics. Everything is $4.00/yd, no matter what it is made of! (Thanks so much to Bridget for this resource!)

Scrap- Creative Reuse: (Portland OR, Arcata CA, Denton TX, Baltimore MD, Richmond VA, Ann Arbor MI)  No online shop, but lucky locals can donate their items to Scrap who sells it to the public or donates to teachers or organizations that can use the items. Scrap can be a fantastic resource for fabrics and notions!

Who Gives a Scrap: (Colorado, USA) Who Gives a SCRAP is a donation based scrap store that carries a mix of arts and craft and hobbies supplies in addition to unique vintage finds. (Thanks so much to Bridget for this resource!)

Blackbird Fabrics: (Canada) Blackbird Fabrics is an online shop with a small collection of Designer Deadstock. Currently, the shop has some really beautiful deadstock printed fabric! Founder Caroline also co-hosts the Love To Sew Podcast!

Matchpoint Fabrics: (Canada) Matchpoint Fabrics is an online shop that offers mostly sustainable fabric options, but they also have a section of Deadstock Fabric. Most of the deadstock fabrics come directly from mills, TV/film sets & designers. (UPDATE: Matchpoint Fabric is currently closed, but you can sign up for their email list when they open again!)

Haines Collection: (UK)If you are looking for a place to buy upholstery fabrics, Haines Collection is the place! Fabrics in this online shop are leftover from designers and manufacturers in the interior industry. Most of these fabrics are high quality, and come with a higher price tag, but Haines Collection sells them at a much lower cost.

The New Craft House: (UK, East London) An online shop & studio filled with designer deadstock fabric. They are located in East London where you can also take a class, set up a private workshop or attend an event!

(Offset Warehouse: (UK) This shop is mainly focused on sustainable textiles, but says they also offer deadstock. There isn’t currently a specific section for deadstock, so you will have to look at each item, but I thought this would still be a good source to add. )

Vintage:

(Shops that have a passion for reducing waste in the textile industry with a love for vintage textiles)

Revival Fabrics: (USA, OR) An online shop featuring vintage fabrics from the 1920’s- 1970’s! This is a great spot for movie costume designers, commercial set stylists, and period re-enactors. They also have vintage pillowcases and sheets still in their packaging!

Olive Road London: (UK, London) A beautiful collection of vintage textiles, including dress fabrics and barkcloths. I love how this online shop allows you to browse by decades! (Olive Road London’s website doesn’t have US shipping but you can contact them directly for purchasing in US!)

Pink Peacock: (Australia) A beautifully curated online shop featuring vintage textiles. Beware, you may purchase more than just fabric here! (Seriously their vintage home wares are amazing!)

Retro Age Vintage Fabrics: (Australia) In business for 15 years, this is a huge resource for vintage fabrics and their online shop allows you to shop by era, content, design, color, or quantity.

Russian Retro Shop: (Latvia) Shop on Etsy featuring vintage fabrics! This shop has some really gorgeous prints!

Etsy Shops

Craft And Thrift Shop: (UK, Scotland) Amy runs an etsy shop filled with deadstock, thrifted and vintage fabrics. Fabrics are sold by the meter, but she also offers scrap packs and notions. (Amy has become a friend over on Instagram and I personally had a great experience sewing with fabric from her shop!)

Sew Modern On Etsy: (USA, California) Sew Modern is a sustainability-focused shop that specializes in deadstock fabrics. There is a mix of vintage, deadstock and natural fibers, so be sure to read the item description to find what you are looking for!

Etsy shops that offer mostly vintage fabrics but also sell destash fabrics, vintage sheets and/or sewing notions:

The Estate Stash: (USA, TN) (shop also sells fabric swatch books)

Found Fabrics Shop: (USA, OR)

Life in the Sass Lane: (USA, NY)

Lingon Berries and Moss: (USA, CO)

Dragonfly Cottage Shop: (USA, MN)

Lizi Rose: (USA, CA) (Destash denim scraps)

Bout Flowers: (UK, Durham)

Jaipur Design Shop: (India) (Shop sells beautiful vintage sari’s and recycled fabrics)

Instagram

@shopwellfibre (USA): Sells secondhand fabrics through instagram. (sewing account here! )

@suziesvintageshop (UK Only): Vintage textiles in her ebay shop – and see more behind the scenes on her other instagram account: Suzie Sharp Vintage!

@farmandtablefabrics: Sells through instagram! Posts sales of vintage and reclaimed textiles.

@shopmakethislook: Sells Vintage fabrics, often shown with inspiration garments! Auctions on Instagram.  Follow her other account to see her beautiful makes: Make This Look

@vintagefabricsandsheets (Australia): Sells vintage fabrics and sheets on instagram!

If there’s a shop you don’t see listed that I should add, let me know! I will do my best to update this list.

(Please keep in mind, these are shops focused on selling reclaimed, deadstock, and vintage fabrics. Sustainable textile shops are also wonderful to purchase from but not included in this list. If you are looking for Sustainable shops, please read Halfmoon Atelier’s list!)

fashion revolution · refashion · sewing · Tutorials

Fashion Revolution Week: Low Waste Alternatives & Skirt to Top Refashion

Hey world changers – how are you doing? We have all been going through some difficult times and I haven’t been talking about it much because I use my sewing as a form of distraction. I hope these refashions & posts have distracted/inspired you in these times!

Today I’m sharing another simple refashion with a “before” you may be familiar with! I made this skirt several years ago, and I’m definitely not the same size I used to be! This skirt stayed in my wardrobe because I love the fabric so much, and I recently moved it to my refashion pile because I wanted to be able to wear it once again!

Fashion Revolution Week: Skirt to Top Refashion- Trish Stitched

This refashion is based off of this cute top! I am a huge fan of gathering and have done multiple peplum refashions, but haven’t tried an empire style top! This skirt was a very simple pleated skirt with a side zipper. Here’s how I refashioned it:

I took off the waistband, removed the zipper and removed the pleats. I took 5″ off the top of the skirt portion, and used that and the waistband to cut a new bodice and straps. I made a lining from some fabric in my stash. After the bust portion was sewn, I gathered the remaining skirt and attached it to the bust. Then the zipper was re-inserted on the back, and straps were sewn on!

Fashion Revolution Week: Skirt to Top Refashion- Trish StitchedFashion Revolution Week: Skirt to Top Refashion- Trish StitchedFashion Revolution Week: Skirt to Top Refashion- Trish Stitched

For the bust, I used a pattern I had in my stash, McCalls 6838, but you can use all different patterns to get a similar result! I made a muslin of the bust portion because I had such little material to work with. Some of the pieces had to be franken-stitched together before making the bust.

Fashion Revolution Week: Skirt to Top Refashion- Trish StitchedFashion Revolution Week: Skirt to Top Refashion- Trish Stitched

Here’s a short video with some behind the scenes!

{Music in Video is Early Hours by Ikson on Inshot App}

Starting on a sustainable fashion journey can often lead into wanting to go sustainable in other areas of life. For the past few years, I’ve been taking small steps towards going “greener” in other parts of my life, mostly trying to reduce the amount of plastic and trash we create. (We already do a lot of the basics, bringing reusable bags to stores, using metal straws and re-usable cups.) My rule of thumb is, when something in our household is running low, I start looking for alternative products, or a more sustainable system. This is a slower process to go waste free but one that is working well for us. Progress over perfection!

Here’s a few of the products I’ve researched, fallen in love with and now use on a daily basis!

Blueland Hand Soap & Cleaners – This was an instagram ad that got my attention. When we first moved into our home we bought glass soap dispensers and bulk liquid soap, but as my bulk was finally running out, I decided to give Blueland a try! We were also running low on household cleaners so we purchased the whole cleaning set. Blueland sells “forever” bottles and tablets. You keep the same bottles, use tap water to fill the bottles and pop in a tablet to refill the soap dispensers and cleaners. The foam soap is amazing, and the cleaners have been great! I bought a double batch of soap so we are stocked for awhile!

Dropps Laundry & Dishwasher Detergent Pods – It took some time to switch our laundry detergent because I’ve had bad skin reactions to detergents in the past and have been afraid to try a new product, but Dropps have been incredible! Dropps are pods and what I love is that they aren’t sold in a giant plastic container! We also bought the dishwasher pods, which we love! Another sustainable option I almost went with is Tru Earth, which are laundry strips!

Soda Stream – I know this is a strange one to be on my sustainable list but it’s a product that has cut down on so much of our waste. Drew and I love bubbly water and we would go through a case of La Croix a week. The recycling bin was getting outrageous, so we switched to Soda Stream last year. We don’t drink much soda, so our system is just used for carbonated water, and this little unit has been awesome!

Next alternatives we are trying: Shampoo and conditioner bars! It took some time to research, but I’m hoping the ones I ordered work for my hair! They are set to arrive next week so I will update soon!

What are some of your low-waste alternatives?

There are a few low waste youtuber’s I love following, and if this is a topic you are interested in, check them out!

Shelbizleee

Sedona Christina

refashion · sewing · sewing activewear

Fashion Revolution Week: Sustainable Activewear & Leggings to Sports Bra Refashion

Today’s fashion topic is one that I love, but one that has a lot of work to do to become more sustainable. Activewear.

My personal sustainable journey with activewear: 

I started running in college, and have since completed several half marathons and full marathons, with smaller races sprinkled in. I also love cycling and other full body workouts. I’ll be completely honest, I love activewear. I love stretchy pants and moisture wicking tops – and while it is most sustainable to wear natural fibers like cotton and linen, that isn’t what this post is focusing on. I am working on progress over perfection, and sharing what I’m learning along the way!

When I first started running, I bought a lot of cheap clothing. Later on, I tried making my activewear to limit my fast fashion shopping, but didn’t have the time to create the kind of active wardrobe I wanted. Fast forward to now, and most of my activewear wardrobe is secondhand. My dad and I recently completed a weekend long challenge of running 48.6 miles in Disney World and almost all my clothing was secondhand! (I did buy two new tops for the shorter races from Raw Threads to show my Disney Love!)

Trish StitchedTrish Stitched

Sewing Activewear:

The hardest part of making my activewear was finding the right fabrics. Active materials in the sewing industry only recently started making waves, which is great for the sewers who want to make their own wardrobes! But, like I’ve mentioned in the past, I now try to look for secondhand materials or more sustainable options for my handmade wardrobe – which are not as widely available.

Last year I was introduced to Repreve Fabric through Pinecrest Fabrics, which is fabric made from recycled water bottles! Repreve is becoming a popular option – and many companies are using their fabrics in active collections, and it is also available to home sewists!

Synthetic Fibers & Microplastics: 

But with synthetic fibers, even recycled water bottles, we face a new problem: Microplastics. Microplastics are tiny little plastic fibers that shed from synthetic fabrics every time they are washed. These little pieces of plastic end up in our water streams, which then end up in our oceans, then our fish and possibly back into our bodies. This isn’t a new issue, but something we are becoming more aware of – and companies have stepped in with products to combat the microplastics.

I have been washing my synthetic fibers with Guppyfriend bag for the last few months, and it is great! Each load washed with Guppyfriend has captured the small “lint” pieces that come off our clothing in a very easy to implement process. There are multiple products that claim to do the same, and even some you can attach to your water systems.

Trish StitchedTrish StitchedTrish Stitched

Today’s Refashion: 

Today I’m sharing a refashion I’ve had planned for a long time, but just haven’t gotten around to making! I’ve had this pair of leggings in my wardrobe for years! It was one of the first pairs I bought when I started running outdoors in winter, a discounted pair that I didn’t wear as much as I thought I would. The fabric is good used condition with a lot of stretch left, but a pair of pants I knew I wouldn’t be wearing again.

Fashion Revolution Week: Sustainable Activewear & Leggings to Sports Bra Refashion- Trish Stitched

One of the ways I refashion is to let the fabric speak and ignore what the original garment is. I didn’t look at this as a pair of leggings, I looked at this as a piece of active material. I used my current favorite sports bra pattern (the Power Sports Bra by Greenstyle) and a little bit of creative cutting for this final result.

Fashion Revolution Week: Sustainable Activewear & Leggings to Sports Bra RefashionFashion Revolution Week: Sustainable Activewear & Leggings to Sports Bra Refashion

I opened the inseam and the waistband to work with the material. To make upcyling look a little less upcycled, I like to mirror pattern pieces for a more intentional look. The bottom section of the ankle stripes became my sides, the wasitband became my back piece and the top section of the ankle stripes became my center front. The lining, waistband and straps came from the rest of the leggings – leaving very little material left over!

Fashion Revolution Week: Sustainable Activewear & Leggings to Sports Bra RefashionFashion Revolution Week: Sustainable Activewear & Leggings to Sports Bra RefashionFashion Revolution Week: Sustainable Activewear & Leggings to Sports Bra RefashionFashion Revolution Week: Sustainable Activewear & Leggings to Sports Bra RefashionFashion Revolution Week: Sustainable Activewear & Leggings to Sports Bra RefashionFashion Revolution Week: Sustainable Activewear & Leggings to Sports Bra Refashion

Sometimes it can be a struggle to cut an even pattern piece – here’s how I did my center front! Trace the pattern piece on a piece of wax paper which will help you see through when tracing onto your fabric. You can mark up the wax paper with stripe placement for an even cut as well!

Fashion Revolution Week: Sustainable Activewear & Leggings to Sports Bra Refashion

I love this sports bra and am happy to put this piece back into my wardrobe- just in another form! And if you were wondering – My leggings in the “after” photos are made from Repreve Recycled Fabrics!

There is so much more to this topic that I can’t put into a simple blog post, but I hope you will check out some of the resources below if you are also on a sustainable fashion journey!

Resources: 

Active Clothing Companies I Love: 

Raw Threads : Read about their fabrics here!

Girlfriend Collective

Outdoor Voices : I always see Outdoor Voices secondhand on ThredUp!

Where to Buy Repreve Active Fabric:

Sew Dynamic Fabric 

Microplastic Filters & Products:

Guppyfriend 

Buy From Patagonia (same price, usually in stock)

Buy from Package Free Shop (more expensive, but great resource for other low waste items)

Girlfriend Filter

Cora Ball

refashion · sewing · Tutorials

Fashion Revolution Week & Simple Dress to Midi Skirt Refashion

It’s Fashion Revolution Week! This is a very important week, and as a refashioner /lover of the planet, this week is a chance for me to bring even more awareness to a cause close to my heart. If you’ve been following this blog for some time, you’ll have seen my posts in previous years about Fashion Revolution. But for those who are new here, or somehow stumbled upon this post – I would love to share what Fashion Revolution is!

Fashion Revolution.org explains it best:

On the anniversary of the Rana Plaza factory collapse, which killed 1,138 people and injured many more in 2013, we encourage millions of people to come together to campaign for systemic change in the fashion industry.

We are living in a climate emergency and the fashion & textiles sector is one of the most polluting and wasteful industries. The industry continues to lack transparency, with widespread exploitation of people working in the supply chain. Never before have there been this many people on the planet in slavery, and fashion is a key driver of this reality. Brands and retailers are still not taking enough responsibility for the pay and working conditions in their factories, the environmental impacts of the materials they use or how the products they make affect the health of people, animals and our living planet. 

If the fashion industry is so horrible, why do we still love shopping and getting new clothes? It’s so easy to ignore something that isn’t directly affecting our daily lives. But if we know what is wrong with the clothing industry, why can’t we do something about it? As a consumer, there are a few things you can do: ask your favorite brands who made your clothes and how. Hold them responsible for their impact, and if they don’t have a good answer or plan on changing – find an alternative.

I am fortunate to have a passion for sewing that has helped me to find alternatives to shopping fast fashion, and with second-hand shopping gaining momentum, it is now easier than ever to say “no” to buying new, unsustainable fashion. This week I’m talking about alternatives in the fashion & sewing industry, ways to be more sustainable in every day life, and sharing some new refashions. One of the most important things to remember about your sustainable journey is that it isn’t about being perfect. Change doesn’t happen overnight, and taking time to make little changes can be more impactful than diving straight in. My wardrobe still isn’t 100% sustainable, and probably won’t be for a few years, but I’m doing what I can at my own pace. World changers aren’t here to judge, we are hear to encourage and inform.

Why do I care about Fashion Revolution? I’ve been part of the world of fashion since I was a child, playing with paper dolls and creating new clothes for them. I’ve dreamed of being a designer, owning a fashion house and making several new lines a year. I’ve envisioned seeing my clothes on people walking down the street, and in shop windows. I’ve always known I was meant to be in the world of fashion, but when I started to really learn about the industry, my dreams started to blur.

I learned about the horrible working conditions, and it was a complete eye opener. A world that I loved had just started crumbling around me – the realities of what my dream meant to others and the planet started setting in and I believed I wasn’t meant for this industry. And I was right. I’m not meant for the traditional fashion industry. I’m meant for this new industry that is forming. One that cares about employees and working conditions, fair pay and materials used, sustainability and inclusivity.

My love for clothing hasn’t changed, but I no longer desire to have my own clothing company. Now, I dream about encouraging others to create. One of the best alternatives to shopping fast fashion is to take a second look at the items already in your wardrobe- and if you sew, you’ll have a lot more opportunity to love your garments over and over!  This week I’m transforming a few pieces that have been sitting in my closet into something new for me to re-love.

Fashion Revolution Week: Dress to Midi Skirt Refashion - Trish Stitched

The first piece up is an Aeropostle dress I thrifted quite a few months ago. I originally bought this dress to wear as-is, but after washing it and trying it on, it was clear the top was too tight for me. The underarms were too high and cut into my armpits, and there were a few stains along the bodice. What drew me to the dress was the longer skirt, so that’s the part I wanted to keep! It didn’t take long to turn this dress into a cute midi skirt for spring/summer.

Fashion Revolution Week: Dress to Midi Skirt Refashion - Trish StitchedFashion Revolution Week: Dress to Midi Skirt Refashion - Trish StitchedFashion Revolution Week: Dress to Midi Skirt Refashion - Trish StitchedFashion Revolution Week: Dress to Midi Skirt Refashion - Trish Stitched

There’s a short video for this piece, but a few written instructions as well. This is for a skirt with front buttons but can be done with a zippered dress as well. With a zipper, you may have to remove and re-install the zipper.

  1. Measure waist to midi length (or the length you would like your skirt to hit) and add 1/2″. Starting your measurement from the bottom of the dress, measure and cut that length on your piece. This way you will get to keep your hem in tact and save a step! My measurement came to 29.5″.
  2. If you are raising the waist of your dress, you may need to take out some extra fabric. I took out 8″ total on my new skirt from the back seam. Starting at the waistline and tapering down to the seamline.
  3. Using the excess material from the bodice of your dress, make a waistband. I wanted a small waistband so mine was 2″ x the length of my waist (+2″ for seam allowance) Add lightweight interfacing to waistband.
  4. Stitch the waistband to the skirt, right sides together with a 1/2″ seam allowance.
  5. Fold the other raw edge of waistband in, then fold waistband in half with wrong sides together, enclosing the raw edges. Topstitch waistband.
  6. I added a hook and eye to the very top of my waistband, but if you have a zipper, there will be no need.

I wanted the front of my skirt to have a clean look with no gathering, but I will be going in and adding elastic to the back, as I tried my skirt on the next day and it wasn’t as secure (thanks to the short detox I’m doing!). Adding a little bit of elastic on the back will help with fit.

Fashion Revolution Week: Dress to Midi Skirt Refashion - Trish StitchedFashion Revolution Week: Dress to Midi Skirt Refashion - Trish Stitched

I’ve wanted a midi skirt in my wardrobe for a long time, but never thought it was right for my short body. Being able to try the style with a second hand piece showed me I can rock and LOVE how midi’s look on me. I am so excited to wear this piece with sneakers and tees, and also dress it up with heels like I did here. It’s going to be a perfect piece for summer in my sewing studio when I want something light and airy to wear.

Fashion Revolution Week: Dress to Midi Skirt Refashion - Trish StitchedFashion Revolution Week: Dress to Midi Skirt Refashion - Trish Stitched

And how cute is that print and those buttons?! I hope you’ll join me along for the rest of the week and ask your favorite brands who made your clothes!

For more info and ways to get involved, visit FashionRevolution.org

sewing · Uncategorized

Striped Anni Jumpsuit

Happy Thursday! Over the past few weeks it’s been really hard to get motivated and stay motivated . I find myself having good days and bad days, but am fortunate to have a great partner who frequently tells me it’s ok to have bad days. We’ve been playing a lot of ping pong and UNO, making sure we take time to just relax and breathe.

At the end of March, beginning of April, I made 80 masks for friends who work in hospitals, and for family working in grocery stores. If you’ve made masks, you can know how time consuming it can be, but more than that, how exhausting. While it was hours of labor, it was also mentally exhausting for me thinking about who would be using them, and the guilt for not making more or not going fast enough. It became a little too overwhelming and I had to stop. Last week I took some time for selfish sewing and made a project that’s been on my list for a few weeks.

I picked up this stripe fabric on my last trip to Fab Scrap, and originally planned to make some sort of dress, but the more I looked at Pinterest, the more I was attracted to striped jumpsuits! I had bought the Anni Jumpsuit Pattern for a different project that I didn’t have enough fabric for, but I had just enough striped material to make this jumpsuit.

What really attracted me to this pattern was the unique bodice design. I fell in love with the diamond shape and the options that came with the Building Block Bundle. This pattern was a little pricier but with several options, it was a price that made sense to me, and a pattern I could see making multiple versions of.

Now, if you want to make this bodice option, I do not recommend this as a beginner pattern. I don’t consider myself a sewing expert but I do have experience, and I wanted to throw these instructions out the window. The instructions and photo representation for this bodice pattern were not enough for me. I spent hours sewing seams, then directly ripping them out. It was frustrating. But eventually I got it, and it was one of those “ah-ha” moments. Once it was actually sewn, the instructions made sense. I could see how it worked, but couldn’t explain it to someone else. While it was frustrating at first, I would make this bodice again in a heartbeat. I don’t say this information to scare you away from making it, but as a warning that it may be difficult to get it at first.

Pattern details: I made Anni Size 4, shortening the bodice by 1” and shortened the pant length. I forgot to save the bottom of the pants to confirm how much I cut off, but my full length pant pattern measures 37”. After sewing the pants, I shortened the top rise by 1.5” as the crotch was just too long for my torso. I also tapered in the pants by 1” as well. I spent so much time making sure my stripes were as matched as I could make them, the last thing I wanted on this jumpsuit was a poor fit.

The last step I did was insert the zipper – and then found another fit issue. After sewing in the zipper, it felt like the jumpsuit back was too long. I went back in and removed 1/2” from the center back, under the waistline to eliminate some of the sloping. Seeing the photos made me question what was actually wrong – and I figured it out. The belt is tied a little too tight causing the zipper to puff out and the butt to look a little more sloped than it actually is. I have since tried it on with the belt tied looser – and no belt- and the fit is great.

I had just enough fabric left over to make a fabric belt to complete look. The pattern does not call for a belt, but I really love defining my waist, and think this striped version looks cuter with the belt.

I love this jumpsuit! I’ve been spending a lot of time defining my style, cleaning out my wardrobe and re-thinking my look, and this fits right in with how I want to dress! Floral prints are definitely still my style, but I love adding in stripes as well.

For anyone interested, the pattern I used for my masks was from Instructables – for a nurse, by a nurse. For family I have been making the pattern from Mimi G.

#RefashionFriday · refashion · sewing

#Refashion Friday Striped Jacket Refashion

Happy Saturday! (I know it’s supposed to be Refashion Friday but my photo shoot didn’t work out so we are a day late!) I hope everyone is safe and healthy in these uneasy times. Drew has been working from home for about 8 days and while it isn’t always easy to have us both working from home I am fortunate his job allows him to be isolating with me.

I haven’t been thrifting in a while, and within the past few weeks, I’ve seen most chain thrift stores shutting their doors, so while there should be no “in person” thrifting, this is a great opportunity to look through your wardrobe or a relatives wardrobe and refashion what you already have!

This week’s refashion was a simple one, but had a pretty big result! First, a little background on how this jacket came into my possession. A few weeks ago, my parent’s sold their farm (and if you’ve been reading this blog for awhile, you’ll know it’s where I used to work!) and had to do some downsizing. Since my mom no longer had to work the farm, she didn’t have a need for a lot of her clothes so her wardrobe got cleaned out. The piece I took with me was one of her old jackets! It has a lot of stains, but I love the style and have been obsessing over stripes lately, so I thought it would be a great wardrobe addition.

Refashion Friday: Striped Jacket Refashion - Trish Stitched

I really didn’t want to change much on this piece. The pockets are awesome, and I love the buttons detailing. All I really needed was a sleeve resize and to make the cut a little less boxy. This jacket is a Petite Petite, the smallest petite size, so this piece is meant to be boxy.  I really love the style, but usually can’t pull it off.

First step was to remove the sleeves and cut the new armhole. The shoulder seam had to come up around 2″ and from that point I reshaped the armhole and re-attached the sleeves. Whenever I cut a new armhole, it is always a little intimidating because I don’t want to cut too far. Something to remember is to leave enough room for a seam allowance!

Refashion Friday: Striped Jacket Refashion - Trish StitchedRefashion Friday: Striped Jacket Refashion - Trish StitchedRefashion Friday: Striped Jacket Refashion - Trish Stitched

If your sleeve length already fits well, your sleeve will be re-attached shorter. For this piece, I let out the hem on the sleeve cuff to make the sleeve longer. It didn’t look the best, but I had some extra black canvas so I made new sleeve cuffs.

Refashion Friday: Striped Jacket Refashion - Trish StitchedRefashion Friday: Striped Jacket Refashion - Trish Stitched

To give a little extra fit to the jacket, I added a drawstring waist. It’s a really simple addition that gives a garment such a cute look. I cut black canvas 2 1/4″ x the waist length of my jacket. I stitched a buttonhole on each side where the cording would come out of the waist. Then I turned the edges of the canvas in 1/4″ and stitched the band on the inside of my jacket waist. Stitch the ends of the band a little further past the buttonholes to enclose everything.

Refashion Friday: Striped Jacket Refashion - Trish StitchedRefashion Friday: Striped Jacket Refashion - Trish Stitched

Refashion Friday: Striped Jacket Refashion - Trish StitchedRefashion Friday: Striped Jacket Refashion - Trish Stitched

I am so happy with this transformation, and happy I can give this jacket a new life with me. I’m going to do a little experimenting to see if I can get some of the bigger stains out of the jacket but because of the ticking stripes, you can’t see the stains unless you are right on top of them.

There’s a video on my IGTV showing the steps to this refashion, and if you want to do a similar refashion – check it out!

A lot of my transformations lately haven’t been ‘extreme’ refashions because I’m still getting all my motivation and inspiration back. But I really love doing these smaller projects because they are quick, pretty easy and really fun to share. I love full refashions, but I love sharing any projects to inspire others who want to try out refashioning. I hope you are inspired to Stay Home & Sew!

sewing

Purple Floral Magnolia Dress – With Craft and Thrift Shop

Happy Sunday! I hope you are safe and healthy wherever in the world you may be! Sewing helps to distract me, and calms me in times of uncertainty, so I hope my work can calm/distract you if only for a moment.

Part of my sustainable fashion journey is buying secondhand/sustainable fabrics, which can be difficult to come by. I’ve often talked about one of my local sources, Fab Scrap, but little online shops are popping up! They often have collections of deadstock, and thrifted fabrics, meaning there is a limited amount – and limited time – for purchasing. For me, this is the perfect way to shop for fabric because I love letting the fabric speak to me. That’s exactly how this dress came to be!

Deer and Doe Magnolia Purple Floral Dress - Trish Stitched (with Craft and Thrift Shop)

Amy from Craft & Thrift Shop on Etsy reached out to me a few months ago about making a piece with fabric from her shop. Amy’s shop is filled with some of the most gorgeous secondhand fabrics, and this stunning print jumped out at me!

Deer and Doe Magnolia Purple Floral Dress - Trish Stitched (with Craft and Thrift Shop)

I thought this material would make a great dress, and Deer & Doe Magnolia was the first dress to come to mind. I had seen such glamorous versions of this dress and have always wanted to make it. Having this fabric seemed like the perfect opportunity! My vision was View A with the full sleeve in midi length, since I knew I would be able to get more wear out of the shorter skirt. But, I realized I had plenty of fabric to go with the full length, so I wanted to test it out before making any final decisions.

Deer and Doe Magnolia Purple Floral Dress - Trish Stitched (with Craft and Thrift Shop)Deer and Doe Magnolia Purple Floral Dress - Trish Stitched (with Craft and Thrift Shop)

I cut the full skirt length and full sleeves from my fabric – which thankfully juuuuuust fit! After stitching the bodice and skirt together (without sleeves) I took a progress photo and asked instagram what to do. It was a resounding yes to keeping the full length skirt. Quite a few comments also said to keep it sleeveless, which I was still on the fence about. But the comments that made the most sense to me were to keep the long skirt for now, and shorten it later if I want to!

Deer and Doe Magnolia Purple Floral Dress - Trish Stitched (with Craft and Thrift Shop)

I still had dreams of the dress with full sleeves, so I had to try it out. I made one long sleeve and kept the other side sleeveless. I tried it on in front of the mirror and for Drew to help me decide. The full sleeve was definitely too overwhelming for me, so I cut the flutter sleeve from the full sleeve. And I think it is the perfect touch! I have a lot of sleeveless dresses, but I don’t have one with flutter sleeves!

Deer and Doe Magnolia Purple Floral Dress - Trish Stitched (with Craft and Thrift Shop)Deer and Doe Magnolia Purple Floral Dress - Trish Stitched (with Craft and Thrift Shop)

Pattern details: I made Magnolia in a size 36, I cut out view A with the plunging neckline but wound up stitching the neckline a little higher because the plunge was too open. The dress came together very smoothly, and quickly! Instructions were great, as was sizing.

Fabric Details: I chose this amazing purple floral print from Amy’s shop to make my dress. It was designed by John Kaldor, and is a woven polyester. Amy ships from Scotland so it was really cool to receive a package from overseas (and quickly!)

Deer and Doe Magnolia Purple Floral Dress - Trish Stitched (with Craft and Thrift Shop)

Deer and Doe Magnolia Purple Floral Dress - Trish Stitched (with Craft and Thrift Shop)Deer and Doe Magnolia Purple Floral Dress - Trish Stitched (with Craft and Thrift Shop)

Shopping for fabric online can be tough. You can’t feel, you can’t see the true colors, all you can go on is the photos and description listed. What makes me thrilled to recommend Craft & Thrift Shop is because you get to buy from another seamstress, who knows what you want to know about the material. What’s the fabric content? What’s the best thing to make with the fabric? Bags or garments, a dress or pants? How about washing instructions? Amy has it all covered. Her shop is organized by fabric type, and she even sells notions, buttons and yarns! Here are some of my current favorites in her shop:

Vintage Orange Floral

Craft and Thrift Shop

Vintage Orange & Green Floral

Craft and Thrift Shop

Multicolor Polyester

Craft and Thrift Shop

Geometric Teal & Gold Upholstery

Craft and Thrift Shop

Oh, in case you were wondering why they are called flutter sleeves, the wind showed me why today!

Deer and Doe Magnolia Purple Floral Dress - Trish Stitched (with Craft and Thrift Shop)

{Fabric was gifted to me from Craft and Thrift Shop, but all opinions are my own}

sewing

My Wedding Dress!

I can’t believe it has already been 4 months since Drew and I got married! Our wedding day was perfect – as was our wedding reception two weeks later. A little background, Drew and I wanted a more intimate ceremony and we said our vows on the rim of the Grand Canyon! Before Drew and I met, I had wanted to visit the Grand Canyon and when we were planning our first big vacation together, I suggested this as one of our destinations. When we first saw the Grand Canyon, I fell in love. Pictures just don’t do it justice and it is such an incredible location. We spent a day exploring, hiking and taking in all the beauty that surrounded us and it quickly became my favorite place.

My Wedding Dress - Trish Stitched

I have always wanted a small wedding. I would have happily been married at the courthouse, but after visiting Arizona, I knew that’s where I wanted to get married. I brought the idea up to Drew before we were engaged and he was more than happy to accommodate my request (good guy right there!). But Drew wanted to have a larger celebration so we also planned a reception back in New Jersey with extended family and friends.

My Wedding Dress - Trish StitchedMy Wedding Dress - Trish StitchedMy Wedding Dress - Trish StitchedMy Wedding Dress - Trish Stitched

Since I taught myself to sew, my dream has been to make my wedding dress- and I was going to make it happen! I wanted something easy enough to walk in at the Canyon, but needed something elegant enough for our reception venue. I started researching gowns and fell hard in love with this silhouette. This was exactly what I wanted and spent weeks searching for patterns to help make this dress a reality. Then I took a pretty long break from wedding dress planning. I thought I had it all figured out. Silhouette was down- patterns found, no fabric but that wouldn’t be too hard. I didn’t need to think about the dress for a few months!

Then June came around and I wanted to start fabric hunting. I knew I didn’t want to upcycle a wedding dress, and my dream was to find reclaimed fabric. Fab Scrap totally came through and I scored three yards of this gorgeous floral mesh. I really wanted beaded fabric, but it is pricey and heavy. This material gave a similar feel of the adornment of beaded fabric, but without the weight and price tag. But I only had three yards to work with. Not one piece extra – and no way to get more. I also picked up a few yards of silk as the underlining for the mesh at Fab Scrap.

My Wedding Dress - Trish Stitched

Now with the extra motivational kick of having my fabric, I started on my first toile. First round went well, the top needed a few major modifications but pinning it in place on my body looked cute! Then I made another toile and it was miserable. I did the changes I had to make and they did not look good. Panic mode set in. I realized that the bodice silhouette was not meant for me. And I started scrolling through Pinterest non-stop to find something else I loved. A lot of the dresses I started pinning had this gorgeous slim and more modest bodice silhouette, and I loved the vintage vibe it was giving off. (inspiration here and here)

So back to pattern shopping I went! Thankfully it was easy to find a pattern for this, and I got back to work. I loved the skirt in the inspiration photo and built a similar pattern. After a toile of the bodice, I knew I was back on the right track and felt confident in the top. The skirt needed some tweaking. I made roughly three toiles of my dream skirt and perfected the fit. And then I realized that the florals on my fabric were not symmetrical- so I couldn’t properly fit my dream skirt onto the fabric. (I tried for hours to make it work- just it just didn’t). There was NO WAY I was going to get new fabric. SO it was back to the drawing board for my skirt.

My Wedding Dress - Trish StitchedMy Wedding Dress - Trish Stitched

The only way I would fit my entire dress in the material would be to make a trumpet style skirt with a seam line above the knees. I had no idea if this style would work on me, but gave it a shot with two more toiles. I needed a little less flare than the pattern was giving me to fit the pattern on my fabric, so I had to tweak the bottom circle skirt multiple times. In total, I made about 10 skirts before feeling comfortable cutting into my real fabric.

To make the final dress, I wanted to make a test dress using fabrics close to what I would be working with. I bought a floral mesh from JoAnns that didn’t break the bank and created my final toile. When I was finished, I went to look in my mirror and started tearing up. It was perfect. The fit, the style, it was everything and more than I could hope for.

My Wedding Dress - Trish Stitched

Then it was time for the difficult part: cutting out the real fabric. It took two days to cut out my fabric. I would cut one piece, freak out a little, do some more measuring, take a break, and cut another piece. If at any point I got too nervous, I stepped away. There was no room to make a mistake. Here’s the fabric with my pattern pieces on top. The spaces without pattern pieces was where I could fit back pieces. 

My Wedding Dress - Trish Stitched

The last piece I had to cut was the back bodice, and I knew I needed to piece material together, but I needed to figure out where. I was able to make the seam line right where the sweetheart bodice ended in the back, so the seam line wouldn’t be as noticeable.

And here’s what I had leftover!

The dress was coming together beautifully. I had bought some material at Joann’s to make a test lining, and it fit so well I decided to keep that as my final lining (To go under the mesh and silk underlining). Everything was coming together, although time was getting short. I took my time with every aspect of the dress. The zipper gave me some trouble, as it was bubbling a bit. I took out the stitches and hand stitched the zipper in, and it helped with the back bubble. (Here it is before the fix)

The hardest part of sewing my dress was the hem. I had done a lot of research on horse hair braid and knew I wanted to use that to give my dress more flare. The issue with the horse hair braid was that it requires a very small hem, which scared me to death. I had to cut the bottom of the dress almost exactly where I needed it to fall. I had my mom pin the hem for me, but it didn’t come out even, so I had to pin it myself. Thankfully I had a dress form, so I put the height of the form to the height of my body. It took so many hours to get the hem right. It was literally perfect. I did let the dress “rest” before hemming, but it still grew just a little bit by the time I was wearing it for our reception. I finished my dress the night before we left for Arizona, although I had to do a little bit of hand stitching while we were there.

My Wedding Dress - Trish Stitched

I am so in love with my dress, and am so SO happy I decided to make it. I am a true procrastinator, but every single step I took was the step I needed to take to end up with this beautiful result. I am so proud of this dress.

Pattern info: The bodice is McCall’s 6838, and the skirt is a modified McCall’s 7569. The skirt was a mix of pattern pieces from both of these patterns, I took the pencil skirt from 7569, and mixed both bottoms/tails to get the final skirt. I tried to remove as many seam lines from the skirt to keep it sleek.

(The following four photos are from our New Jersey reception with photographer Jenna Wilde Photography)

My Wedding Dress - Trish StitchedMy Wedding Dress - Trish StitchedMy Wedding Dress - Trish StitchedMy Wedding Dress - Trish Stitched

Extra Info: I wanted a little more bling and added a belt from David’s Bridal. The belt actually cost more than my fabric! I also wore a pin on my lining that was my Grandma’s. My “something blue” was floral hanger straps I sewed into the dress. My shoes were from DSW, rose gold to match my ring. Yes, I wore heels at the Grand Canyon, I didn’t want to be so short next to my 6’ tall husband!

My Wedding Dress - Trish Stitched

And one of my favorite parts, feeding each other cheesecake at the Grand Canyon!

My Wedding Dress - Trish Stitched

Everything was perfect, I’m so happy to finally be married to my best friend!

My Wedding Dress - Trish Stitched

Grand Canyon Photos from Jane in the Woods Photography.