handmade wardrobe · sewing

Quilted Kelly Anorak

You may have seen this jacket on my instagram a few months ago, but I finally took some photos of it and wanted to share the details from this make!

Back in March I saw a tiktok of a woman wearing a blue quilted jacket with a bomber jacket neckline, and closed with both snaps and a zipper. One day, while in line at Target, I spotted a jacket that looked very similar to what I had been looking for, and sure enough it was the jacket! (Original jacket no longer on Target’s website, but I found a photo of it here) I really wanted to make an ever-so-popular quilted jacket, but I didn’t want to make a jacket from an actual quilt and this inspiration piece was exactly what I was looking for to get started on my own version.

I found the perfect secondhand fabric from A Thrifty Notion, a Sage Cotton Twill, and bought three yards. I had been looking at bomber jacket patterns but couldn’t find anything with the closure details I wanted. The only pattern I knew of (and made before) with the snaps and zipper close was the Kelly Anorak from Closet Core Patterns. Using this pattern would mean I wouldn’t have the same neckline as the inspiration piece, but I was ok with that change.

I previously made View A (view it here), and have used the pattern pieces in several projects over the years. The Kelly Anorak has been one of my favorite patterns, and I really enjoy the sewing process because of the instructions and sew-a-longs that are online. For this version I went with View B, and made different pockets to get a similar look to the inspiration piece.

I measured at a size 4, but cut a size 6 to account for the extra material and batting. It fits perfectly but a little tight in the arms if I were to wear a thick sweater underneath. (Closet Core makes a lining expansion kit for the Kelly with a new sleeve pattern, for those interested).

Going into this make, I knew I didn’t want a jacket with a seperate lining. The idea was to make the quilting on the front and have the interior look like a solid backing. It took much longer, and I removed and re-stitched basting stitches a few times, but I love the finished look.

The quilting was a very long process, and I spend a few days just stitching the body pieces of the jacket. I cut 2x the body and front facing pieces, as well as the sleeve pieces (more detail on this down below!) I cut 1x batting pieces for the body pieces, sleeves and front facings. Since the full back had batting, I didn’t think it was necessary to add more batting to the back facing. (I also added batting to the collar)

I marked the stitching on each piece with an erasable fabric pencil, and basted the batting pieces to each pattern piece. (Also, if you are looking for a fabric pencil, I’ve had the Sewline Mechanical Pencil for years and love it so much! You can get white, black, blue and pink lead.) I wanted to try to match the quilting lines as much as I could, so once one piece was marked out, I matched it up with the next piece to continue the lines. It didn’t work out perfectly, but I did create some pretty side seams.

After the quilting was stitched, I trimmed the batting seam allowances on each piece. This kept the bulk out of my seam finishing’s which helped during construction. Once the pieces were quilted, I basted the “lining” to each piece to create my final fabric. This took a lot of ironing, and a lot of patience at the sewing machine, but once the fabric was complete, the construction of the jacket was straightforward.

I finished my seams as the pattern recommended, with flat felting, (tutorial from Closet Core here).

I didn’t have enough fabric for the sleeve “lining” and I didn’t want them to be too bulky so I took apart an old make for the extra material! I made this raincoat a few years ago but never wore it and moved it into my refashion pile. I had to do a little bit of “franken-stitching” to get the full sleeve piece, but the color and weight of the fabric was perfect for my sleeves!

I only made one size adjustment and that was in sleeve length. I didn’t think about it before cutting and quilting my sleeve, but before attaching the cuff, I realized the sleeve was just a bit too long. Since I already did the construction for my cuffs (out of order on the pattern instructions), and stitched the sleeve to the body, and finished the seam with bias binding, I wasn’t able to alter the length anywhere else but the hemline. Instead of a 5/8″ seam allowance, I sewed the cuff at 1 1/4″. It makes the sleeve extension shorter, but left the sleeve intact.

My hem was finished with binding and hand stitching. And the last step was adding the snaps, which I made Drew hammer because I was terrified of messing them up! Cutting holes in a completed garment is so scary!

I am so proud of this jacket! I’ve already worn it several times, and can’t wait to keep wearing it once the temperatures get back out of the freezing zone!

Quick Links:

Pattern: Closet Core Kelly Anorak: View B, Size 6

Fabric: A Thrifty Notion: Sage Cotton Twill, Secondhand

Hardware: Wawak: Zipper and Snaps

2 thoughts on “Quilted Kelly Anorak

  1. Wow. That is absolutely amazing. The fit of the jacket looks perfect and the sewing is perfection. Thanks for sharing all the details. Now all I need to do is work out if I need another jacket in my wardrobe😀

    Like

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