inspiration · #RefashionFriday

#RefashionFriday: Refashion Inspiration!

Happy Friday everyone! I have a whole bunch of projects in the works but nothing is finished so I thought I would share a few of the refashions I’ve been falling in love with lately! The refashioning world has been on fire lately, and there is so much inspiration all around!

Refashion Inspiration

 

1. Jeans to Overall Dress Refashion – Sew Much Love, Mary

 

Refashion Inspiration

This amazing refashion is adorable, colorful and so creative! Mary also has a photo tutorial on her blog to help you to make your own version! Yes, I am totally looking at my denim collection right now!

 

2. Skirt to Jumper Refashion – Chickie WU (ICanWorkWithThat.blogspot.com)

Refashion Inspiration

Don’t have an old pair of pants to cut up? How about using a skirt like Chickie! Such a good upcycle, and great use of the fringe hem!

 

3. DIY Faux Fur Purse Upcycle- Sarah (Our Life is Beautiful)

top-10-elegant-3

Sarah over at Our Life Is Beautiful (aka the queen of refashioning) shared this upcycle which is the perfect “no sew” update! Get the tutorial on her blog!

 

4. Fringe Dress Refashion – Heather Handmade

Refashion Inspiration

Heather always has clever refashions and I love this simple update she recently shared! This would be great to update a dress rather than buy one of make one from scratch for any holiday party you have coming up! Get the tutorial on her blog!

 

5. Downsize a Sherpa Coat – Cotton and Curls

Refashion Inspiration

These coats had a major moment a few years ago, and I know that both my sister and I had one! Update it with a simple shorten and tuck in to use it as a layering piece all winter!

 

6. Sweatshirt Upcycle – Portia from Makery 

Refashion Inspiration

This cute sweatshirt is from Portia over at Makery.co, and in the latest issue of Simply Sewing Mag! I have to get my hands on a copy to make this!

 

7. Dress to Two Piece Refashion – Sewing With Jirah

IMG_9433 (2)

I saw this refashion on instagram and fell in love! The print it great, and that top is so cute – makes me want to travel somewhere tropical! This is definitely better as a two piece!

 

What did I tell you? Some AMAZING inspirations around the internet lately! Have you seen any recent refashions that inspired you? I’d love to see them!

Advertisements
#RefashionFriday · inspiration · refashion · sewing · Tutorials

#RefashionFriday Easy Top Refashion

Happy Friday! If you are reading from anywhere by me, happy snow day! We got quite a few inches, and it’s pretty messy out there. So it’s the perfect time for #snowdaysewday! And that’s exactly what I’ve been doing, sewing!

I have a new refashion to share, and it’s such an easy one – you can do it with a top in your own wardrobe right now!

A little backstory on this shirt: I didn’t buy this until the third time I saw it. I fell in love with the print, but didn’t need a new refashion project, so I left it behind, especially since it didn’t have any tears or stains, it could be worn as is. Second time seeing it, I still loved it, but I still passed. When it was there the third time around, I knew it was a sign that I had to get it. I gave others plenty of time to buy it, but it sat and needed a little love. (and a few less shoulder pads!)

This refashion didn’t stay in my pile for long because I knew I wanted to keep it easy, especially after my last refashion. This top was a size M, and while I’m normally an XS in women’s sizes, this refashion would work even better if you had a top that already fit!

#RefashionFriday Easy Top Refashion - Trish Stitched

Since I had to resize, that was the first step. I removed the sleeves and took in about 2″ on each side. I did taper it out, so my sides stayed wider towards the bottom.

#RefashionFriday Easy Blouse Refashion - Trish Stitched#RefashionFriday Easy Blouse Refashion - Trish Stitched

With the shirt inside out, on the back, mark from underarm-underarm, about 1″ under the line where the underarms meet. Seam rip the sides up to that point, and a little more for your seam allowance, I did an extra 1/4″. (I like to keep my seam allowances smaller).

#RefashionFriday Easy Blouse Refashion - Trish Stitched#RefashionFriday Easy Blouse Refashion - Trish Stitched

The line previously drawn is where we cut! Cut the back piece away.

For the contrast back, I used an old tank top in my refashion pile. If you don’t have an old top, use the cut off back to draft a new piece, add a hem as long as you want!

RefashionFriday

Cut the new back to desired length. For mine, I cut straight across the underarm!

#RefashionFriday Easy Blouse Refashion - Trish Stitched

Next step, attach the new back! Start by attaching the top printed back to the new back (wrong sides together), before sewing the sides. I had a little extra fabric in my printed shirt, but made a little pleat in the center to account for it.

For my resized top, I had to hem the front up before attaching the sides, since my tank hem was already finished.

#RefashionFriday Easy Blouse Refashion - Trish Stitched

If needed, resize the sleeves, and you are done! I also turned the existing cuff up again to shorten the sleeve.

#RefashionFriday Easy Blouse Refashion - Trish Stitched#RefashionFriday Easy Blouse Refashion - Trish Stitched

I really do love how this top turned out, and how easy it was to give it a little face lift!

#RefashionFriday Easy Top Refashion - Trish Stitched#RefashionFriday Easy Top Refashion - Trish Stitched#RefashionFriday Easy Top Refashion - Trish Stitched

 

Looking for a little more blouse inspiration?

This refashion from etsy is a beautiful example of mixing fabrics.

Refashion Ideas

This top is a great idea for those shirts a little too tight (original link broken)

Refashion Ideas

And this refashion is too good not to share. If you have two similar shirts, or want to mix up a favorite shirt, how about something like this?

Refashion Ideas

Happy Friday!

inspiration · refashion · sewing

The Refashioners 2018: Trench Coat Refashion

Happy Halloween! Today is all about the treats, because I am so happy I finished my entry to the Refashioners challenge! For those that aren’t familiar, The Refashioners Challenge is an online competition created by Portia from Makery, that challenges participants to refashion based on a theme. In previous years, I’ve done a denim refashion and a suit refashion. The rules for this year were a little different -it’s all about being inspired by a look or outfit and recreate your own version!

I love the refashioners because it takes me out of my refashioning bubble to test my skills and creativity. But this years challenge of being “inspired by” left me stumped. I was thinking of a movie character or favorite actor who’s style I liked, but came up blank! After the challenge was released, Cath Kidston came out with a cute jacket I really wanted, so I set out to try to find pieces to refashion it! Unfortunately, it was tough to find the right pieces and this project quickly became a pain. Since I couldn’t make the jacket from my favorite designer, I starting looking at fashion from my other favorite designers. I love Alice and Olivia, and think the style of clothing is so fantastic, but the price of their clothing, not so fantastic. I saw this trench coat and automatically fell in love! But at $660, there was no way I would ever buy that. But, it looked like it could make for a great refashion! Here’s the final result!

Refashioners 2018 Trench Coat - Trish StitchedRefashioners 2018 Trench Coat - Trish Stitched

It took a few weeks to find a trench coat, and I was surprised by the lack of trenches in thrift stores! I went to a rummage sale and found this beauty! I loved the cuff detail, and that it was a double breasted coat, both features the original coat had. And at $12, it was perfect!

I had to rack my brain for a few days to figure out how to cut and re-sew to make it look like the original trench coat, but the first thing I knew I had to do was re-size the entire coat. I removed the collar, arms and body, which also removed the lining and the zippered lining that came with the coat.

Refashioners 2018 Trench Coat - Trish Stitched

First I removed 2″ from each side front piece. I didn’t want to disturb the pockets, and I had to watch the buttons on the front, so taking two inches was as much as I could take. Thankfully it worked out beautifully!

I cut the center back in half to take 4″ out to mimic the front. With all the alterations, I had to alter the neckline to refit the collar. But before the collar, I wanted to fit the sleeves!

Refashioners 2018 Trench Coat- Trish Stitched

The sleeves needed to be taken in a few inches, and the tops had a strange curve to them that needed to be straightened out. The sleeves also had to be chopped in half to make room for the gathered bottoms, and I was able to use the excess of the lower sleeve for the gathering! The cuff detail with D-ring from the original coat was sewn onto the new sleeve, so I was able to use almost the full sleeve!

Refashioners 2018 Trench Coat- Trish Stitched

The part of this refashion that I was extremely nervous about was the collar. I rarely sew collars, and have never drafted my own but I was lucky this coat came with an under collar, and I was able to re-attach the original to the new neckline. I used the old collar outline to make the new collar, just extending the sides. I had to do a few alterations on the new collar, but thankfully it went together easily!

Refashioners 2018 Trench Coat- Trish StitchedRefashioners 2018 Trench Coat- Trish Stitched

To finish it out, I cut about 6″ off the length, and stitched down the open collar flaps to give it the shape of the original design.

Refashioners 2018 Trench Coat- Trish StitchedRefashioners 2018 Trench Coat- Trish StitchedRefashioners 2018 Trench Coat- Trish Stitched

Overall, it doesn’t match exactly to my inspiration, but I love it! The sleeves were gathered more than I intended but it definitely adds more flair! I’m happy with how the collar area came out, and I can wear it a little more open but pull it tighter as well.

Refashioners 2018 Trench Coat- Trish StitchedRefashioners 2018 Trench Coat- Trish StitchedRefashioners 2018 Trench Coat- Trish Stitched

I’m really happy with the result, and so happy that I finished. I took some video of the process and am hoping to put it all together soon. What do you think? Did I do the designer coat justice or should I leave the expensive designs to the pros?

Drew and I have a wedding on Friday and it looks like perfect trench coat weather, so she will have her first outing soon!

Update: Here’s the video!

Home Sweet Home · inspiration

New Sewing Studio!

The past few weeks have been super busy around our home! We’ve had a few inspection/ maintenance work appointments, our new couches will be here soon, and the floor in my studio was just finished!

ACS_0126[2870]Trish Stitched

When we were house hunting, my main priority was finding a home with a dedicated sewing space ( I know, I know, priorities! haha). We saw a lot of houses that offered an extra room, but to be honest, the idea of having my sewing studio in a “spare bedroom” was less than desirable. I really wanted an attic space, where I could go upstairs and shut out the rest of the house and just work. Being away from the rest of the house would allow me to not look out the door and see the cleaning I had to do, or remind me to do all the laundry.

Working from home (as I talked about before) can be really daunting and overwhelming. I wanted a place I could completely transform, and an attic fit the bill. We were extremely fortunate to win the house we did, but I felt even luckier because the attic was already finished!

When we moved in, the attic was split into two, a wall down the middle, with a spare bedroom on one side and a small office space on the other. The very first thing I wanted to do was tear down the wall. And the second thing was rip up the hideous carpet.

Drew didn’t want to tear down the wall. He was super against it and was afraid we would lose value in the house. We “compromised” by agreeing to cut an arch in the wall, so the small closet would remain. THANKFULLY, the contractor was on my side about tearing it down completely, and Drew finally came to his senses.

During the home inspection, we saw that there was decent flooring under the carpet, so we thought it would be a quick staining and finishing and we would be good to go! Well, we now know why the previous owners put down carpet. The floor was painted different colors.

After realizing this project was going to need a lot more time and money than initially planned, I started getting really frustrated that my space just wasn’t ready. We decided to paint the floor, and set out researching how to DIY it, since it seemed quick and inexpensive.

After a lot of hemming and hawing, and researching paint and not finding the right color, Drew and I decided to get the floor refinished- this way we would be keeping the original floor, and it would add value back to the house.

However, the floor had a lot of problems. Not only was the paint an issue, but there were many holes and a whole section with patches of different wood. The quote we got to refinish was high, and it was suggested we get prefabricated flooring to cover it up, since there was no guarantee the paint would be able to be sanded off. We decided to do the prefab floor and went with oak flooring in an espresso stain.

And last week, my floor was finally finished and I could start moving upstairs! Here’s Before, During and After!

Trish StitchedTrish StitchedACS_0126[2870]Trish Stitched

I’ve been looking up studio inspiration on pinterest for months before we found a house – and after we were in contract on this house, I went all out with research, so I wanted to share some of my studio inspiration!  A lot of my current furniture won’t fit, so there isn’t too much I can bring upstairs yet. I’m planning on an Ikea trip in the next few weeks (and hopefully a stop at the Container Store!) so I’m making my shopping list now!

Here’s a few more views of my space!

Trish StitchedTrish StitchedIMG_7549[2866]

Since it’s an attic, the walls are slanted, and there’s a lot of unusable space with low ceilings, so my research is a little specific, but there’s still a lot of inspiration for any sewing space! It’s also a good thing I’m short because I can still make use of the smaller spots!

First things first. I have never had a work table, and my ironing board has always worked overtime as my general work space and ironing station. For the first time ever, I want a dedicated desk where I can pin and plan and make piles that would usually be on my ironing surface!

This is technically a kitchen island, but it’s the perfect height for a shorty like me, more affordable than traditional craft tables, and is big enough for projects without overwhelming the space!  I’ve been learning to think outside the box for researching craft room ideas and looking at kitchen islands opened up another world of options! I also wanted room for stools to sit when they aren’t in use, and this will allow me to store them underneath.

vadholma-kitchen-island-black__0603385_PE680793_S4

I don’t have a traditional closet, so no room to hang anything on doors, and no hidden shelving, but this shelving from Ikea is ideal for the space! I have a few hidden storage doors where I plan on holding a lot of my fabric, but these shelves can hold trinkets, and my pretty, displayable fabrics!

algot-wall-upright-shelves-white__0477071_PE616743_S4

I also like the idea of floating shelves, for buttons, hardware and baskets filled with all those little sewing notions we can’t live without. The wall space I have isn’t very high, but I’ll still have room for 3-4 shelves. These from etsy would go with my space beautifully.

317a83adc7de6c260a286467ee385a2c

I am able to use my current sewing desks, but I need a space for shipping. I mostly use poly mailers and tissue paper, so flat storage is important. I’m looking at these set-ups for inspo:

e28e4b299c9e9500fb3d72e04e22106e

39456163711639a9364f5de7488f29e3

I love all the pegboard looks, but I don’t have too much wall space for them! Something longer and shorter would fit on my wall. I love the idea of scissors and marking tools in easy to reach places!

b7a528adcc21edcb1d75621fdac98b41

5123cba5c35fdd86998ddb3a566a0ecc

Half of the room doesn’t have much usable space, with the low ceiling, but there is a little bit of room for a reading nook! I can’t fit a full size chair, but some floor poufs and pillows would still make a cozy space. I need this corner to have easy to move pieces so I can still get in and out of the small door in the wall.

a83ca5ca4a0ee63cb19898bc9a279c3f

I’m also trying to control my color palette. I have a lot of white, brown and black pieces, but the big pop of color that keeps coming up is green. I’ve been trying to keep those colors in mind when shopping for things like rugs, pillows for my nook and fabric baskets for my accessories. I really want to maintain a “clean look” but still leave my space open for my love of color, so it’s just another aspect to keep in mind. Ultimately, I don’t want it to look like a jumble of mismatched pieces, which is my normal look!

Planning is definitely more specific for my space, but I love being able to take inspiration and make it smaller! Any tips for perfecting my sewing room?

#RefashionFriday · handmade wardrobe · inspiration · refashion · Uncategorized

#RefashionFriday Denim Jacket Re-mix

Happy Friday!

This refashion has been such a long time in the making, I am so excited to share it with you! The story for how this came about it a little long, so I wanted to share my photos in-between all that text!

DSC_0050

Before this refashion, the only denim jacket in my wardrobe was from middle school. I feel like I’ve mentioned that before here on the blog, but it’s true, my Gap Kids denim jacket is still getting its wear in my wardrobe. The sleeves are way too short, and the body looks awkwardly short with pants and shirts, so the arms always stay rolled, and I only wear it over dresses. I don’t wear it all that often, but I haven’t found a RTW version that I liked to replace it.

So when Seamwork Audrey came out, I knew it was a pattern to go on my “make list”. My initial thought was to make it out of recycled materials, because there is a crazy amount of used denim in the world! The only old jeans I had in my stash were a mix of light and dark denim and I just didn’t want that much shade difference to make it look super upcycled. Not having the proper pieces, I decided to wait to make it.

DSC_0034

A few weeks ago I was thrifting for some jeans for another project (I’ll share soon!) and had some leg remnants left over – as well as an extra pair I didn’t end up using for the other project. So I finally had a good amount of fabric to play with!

DSC_0100-001DSC_0017-006

The plan was in place, the materials gathered, I was ready. Then I saw this beautiful photo on pinterest and a little lightbulb went off in my head. I would finally be able to use this fabric remnant I’ve been dying to use!

We all have those pieces in our stash that you have a general idea for, and even though it doesn’t feel 100% right, there is an eventual purpose for that fabric. No, just me the hoarder? Alrighty then.  Well, I had this remnant I got from a friend and the print was so beautiful, I wanted to make a shirt for myself to enjoy the print. I was struggling with finding the right pattern and fabric to mix with it, and (if you zoom in on the photo) there were grommets on each panel, so the only true usable piece was the top corner. So this piece sat until I could spend more time on it. (I should also mention it’s similar to a quilting cotton)

IMG_6897[2602]

DSC_0041-001

After seeing that inspiration, I knew this fabric was destined to go with my new denim jacket.

I have a huge problem when it comes to sewing projects, because even if I have a whole pile of unfinished things, I need to start new ideas to constantly keep my mind flowing. So I left behind a dress due in a few weeks and cutting out new backpacks to make this jacket.

Seamwork’s goal has always been about quick projects you can finish in a few hours, and I’m not sure why my mind accepted that to be true for something like a denim jacket. They shifted their pattern’s a few months ago to be a little more detailed, so this project took way longer than expected. I was hoping to finish last week, but I really wanted to take more time to make it perfect, so I waited to share and I think it was worth it.

DSC_0055-002

Audrey has a lot of pattern pieces.  And since I’m tiny, my jeans are tiny, so I had a lot less fabric to work with – and I really had to stretch my thinking when cutting out the fabric. I used one pair of remnant jean legs, one full pair of jeans, and had to make the sleeves and a few other pieces out of fabric leftover from my handmade jeans, as well as using the fabric remnant for the back piece and pocket linings.  If you want to make your own recycled denim jacket, I would suggest to get 4-5 pairs, to be safe.

DSC_0188-001DSC_0176

I have seen versions of recycled denim jackets (scroll down to see more inspo!) and knew I wanted mine to have symmetry and purpose, not just a bunch of scraps thrown together. I made sure each side “matched” denim (ex. each center middle panel were cut from the same pair of jeans). When it comes to using multiple pieces to make something new, it really comes down to fabric placement to create the final look.

DSC_0119-003

Details about Audrey:

Cut: Size 2

Modifications to pattern: Added 1″ to the sides of Back Center Panel & removed 1″ from Back Side Panel.

Problem Areas: The welt pockets. I’ve made welt pockets before (Refashioned Bomber) but they are not commonly on my radar. Once I read the directions about 10 times to let them really sink in, it all clicked. Seamwork does have an article about Welt Pockets, which is a great resource as well.

Everything else went together smooth. I also ran out of topstitching thread, so not all areas have the pretty gold stitching, but I think it works out well that way.

DSC_0114-001DSC_0124DSC_0120-001DSC_0117-001DSC_0138-002

Details about my back modification: My fabric panel had this beautiful border and I wanted to use at least a bit of it on the back. To make this happen, I extended the back center panel 1″ on both sides, and took 1″ from the back side panel to account for the modification. I also quilted my back fabric to give it a little more body. It was a simple quilting, but adding batting and a backing, definitely gave the back a sturdier feel.

I added this lace leftover from my refashioned kimono right under the panel. Originally I had it going cross the entire back, but re-did it to go across just the panel as it looks cleaner.

DSC_0186-003

My hope for this jacket is to rough it up a little. It does have a worn in feel since it’s almost all used jeans, but taking some sand paper or a razor to a few sections is something I’m looking into. I also wouldn’t mind adding more trim if I come across cohesive trim I like. I really feel like this could turn into one of those pieces that stays in my wardrobe until I’m old and grey and my kids want to borrow it for a “retro feel”. I’m excited to see what adventures there are for this jacket in the future.

Inspiration: 

This etsy shop is filled with “festival style” denim jackets and it’s huuuuge embellishment inspo!

il_570xN.1153702354_gmyl

Add a little colored denim for a more unique look.

fa329eae74c020192dd330b1e32c37c1

or mix light and dark denim like this:

3f081fd9c7e1398f8fd08068e0ee56e3

The Pin that started it all.

lola-guarch-12-min-e1526550881709

The next jacket isn’t super related but I have to share because it’s amaaazing!

A girl after my own creative heart: Once Upon A Lauren was featured on Hoboken Girl awhile ago and I’ve been in love with her work since! Tell me this hand-painted leather jacket isn’t drop dead GORGEOUS! Thrift Upcycling at it’s finest!

il_570xN.1520508802_536s

If you spot a great denim or leather jacket at a thrift store, or have one gathering dust in the back of your closet, I hope this inspires you to have a little fun!

being ethical · inspiration

Haulternatives & What To Do After Fashion Revolution

Happy Monday! With Fashion Revolution week behind us, it may be easy to say “See you next year”, but around here, we want to encourage a Fashion Revolution all year long.  While most revolution-ers may be focused on asking brands who made our clothes, the goal of the week is to also inform about “Haulternatives” to shopping new and today I’m taking it a step further to talk about how to get rid of unwanted clothes, because even as makers, there are pieces we don’t want!

03SL2012BuyerarchyofNeeds

I’ve been on the search for the best way to dispose of unwanted clothes for years. Since my wardrobe isn’t 100% handmade, I still have store bought pieces I am slowly getting rid of because they no longer suit my style. My first instinct is always to refashion, but there are some pieces too good to chop up, and some too unusable to wear. I’ve done several things to limit my landfill waste when it comes to apparel including:

1.Selling online. Ebay is super easy to set up, and you get free listings every month, so you only pay when something sells! This is a great place for gently used clothing items that you actually want to get real money back for. Poshmark has also become a popular app, and a great one if you are constantly on your phone. A few other places are: Mercari, LetGo, and even Facebook Marketplace (although a few of these are more for furniture or tech pieces, I’ve seen clothing on them as well). Etsy is also an option – but the clothes must be “vintage” (over 20 years old) or have been altered in some way. (Etsy is also the best if you have handmade pieces to sell!)

When I’ve been on thrifting trips, I’ve actually picked up some items in the store that are New With Tags and have sold them online, making a small side income to support my fabric addiction. There are many people who make re-selling their full time job, and from my perspective, it’s such a great way to keep good clothes in circulation and getting them to the right customer.

2. Donate to ThredUp or a local location. ThredUp is an online thrift store that will pay you for your gently worn clothes. Fill up one of their polka dot bags, send it in and watch the money come in! You can use the funds to buy clothes through ThredUp, donate to a cause or cash out to buy more fabric! There are also local consignment shops that will give you cash for clothes and another favorite of mine is Plato’s Closet. These places will not give you a lot of money for your used goods, but it’s a great alternative to throwing them away, or dropping it in one of those “unknown clothing bins!”.

Worried about what they do if your clothes aren’t accepted? Here’s ThredUp’s response:

“We have high quality standards and typically accept less than 40% of the clothing we receive. Items that are still in great shape but don’t meet the thredUP standards are sold to third party sellers. Items that are no longer in wearable condition are passed onto our textile recycling partners and upcycled. The proceeds we recoup through this process help us cover some (but not all) of the shipping and labor costs incurred for the unaccepted items we receive.”

If you have specific items to donate, like a prom or wedding dress, a simple search will help you find local donation centers or charity events that look for these pieces! (and because I love making things as easy as possible, here’s a list of places to donate a wedding dress you may have: babble.com )

3. Recycle through H&M. They take any and all fabric/clothing waste & give you a coupon for the donation! What do they do with it? They re-distribute the good quality clothing for re-sale, upcycle the good pieces of material into new store collections and then recycle all the small scraps and unwearable pieces! This is the bag of scraps and failed sewing projects I brought in a few months ago. (and no, I didn’t use my coupon!)

IMG_4207[2140]

You can read more about their initiative here. I’ve come across a few people who are very opposed to H&M recycling program, saying that they don’t recycle as much as they claim to. While I don’t believe every single thing I read on the internet, I do trust that they are trying their best to make a change in this world, and putting greater power into recycling, so I am willing to give them a shot. They also have a pretty large voice in the industry, so I’m happy encourage their efforts!

Another alternative is to look up a recycling location with the Council for Textile Recycling. This council is something I’ve recently learned about but the mission is simple: Keep clothing, footwear and textiles out of landfills. They have a locator search tool to help you find places to donate used goods nearby. Near me, Goodwill takes old materials. I have heard that scrap bags and unusable materials should be labeled as such before donation – ask your local branch what they prefer.

clothing-life-cycle

Thrifting/second hand shopping is becoming one of the most popular forms of retail – and I don’t think that’s going to end any time soon. Take a look at the 2018 Fashion Resale Report by ThreadUP. Companies are listening to the demand of less fast fashion. They hear us, and they are making changes because now it’s either change or lose business.

02-01-closetoftheFuture-2x

As a maker, I am always on the lookout for recycled materials to use. My handbags use a lot of fabric swatches, which I got from a local interior designer and I just received my first order from Fab Scrap to use in my wardrobe!

IMG_5632[2142]

If you are unfamiliar with Fab Scrap, they are a company reducing waste in the apparel industry at the factory level. There is so much unused fabric in fashion collections, that most companies don’t know how to recycle or sell it. Enter: Fab Scrap, and now you can buy designer fabrics at cheap prices while supporting recycling efforts! You can buy scrap packs, which have smaller scraps or yard packs which include 5 + yards of curated materials. I bought a “warm pack” and asked for florals and solids to make blouses and dresses (silkier pieces) and they listened!

I hope my little series has inspired you to think about the pieces in your closet. Just because you don’t like something, doesn’t mean you have to keep it! Keep Fashion Revolution going by Refashioning, Recycling, and Consciously Shopping. These are all ways to help make our planet a little greener.

It’s such a great time to encourage others to take a step to think about their wardrobe as well. Want to encourage more handmade? Me Made May starts TOMORROW and you know I’m taking part! I use Me Made May to see the gaps in my handmade wardrobe and which pieces don’t get any wear. It’s also a time to push myself to finish a few projects I have hanging around to have another outfit or two for the month!

IMG_5744

I am really excited for this year’s Me Made May and can’t wait to be inspired by every one else’s wardrobes!

inspiration

Fashion Revolution Week: My Favorite Refashioners

Hello again, Fashion Revolutionaries! Today is all about spreading that refashioning love! I wanted to share my favorite refashioners to keep the DIY inspiration going! So lets get into it!

Before After[2136]

Pearl & Scissors is run by Hanna and her refashion archive is loaded with inspiration like this Skirt to Dress Refashion!

pearlandscissors

If you’ve looked up refashioners before, you have definitely come across Trash to Couture. She has done an incredible amount of refashions, most of them with tutorials so you can make your own versions! I loooove this dress makeover.

trashtocouture

Maybe it’s because she has a great eye for prints, or because her son is adorable, I love Melissa from Trevor Loves Mommy (lets be honest it’s both those reasons & more). She does a lot with florals, and I’m really partial to those refashions- just like with this dress to jumpsuit refashion!

trevorlovesmommy

I “met” Chickie Walsh (I Can Work With That)  through Instagram and loved her take on some classic pieces. You may remember my Cargo Pants to Vest Refashion – that was a direct copy from Chickie’s piece! She is constantly turning the old into new, like with this dress refashion!

icanworkwiththat

I recently came across A Pair and A Spare on Pinterest. I don’t know what took so long to find her, but I’m glad I did! Her refashions look so professional, and are super inspiring. A simple shorts refashion turned out so chic!

pairandaspare

Carissa Knits is a refashioning master. Seriously: Look at her page. I absolutely love what she did for the Jeans Refashioner Challenge in 2016!

carissaknits

Heather, from Heather Handmade, is such a sweetheart and her refashions are wonderful! I also can’t believe how much sewing she gets done with three kids- she’s Super Woman! This coat refashion is awesome and super special since it was her Grandma’s!

feathersflights

Amy Nicole is a fellow shortie, and one of the founders of the restyling exchange! She has such a cute style and even re-made her wedding dress!

amynicolestudio

Of course, the beautiful Sarah is on my list of favorites. Her refashions are always awe inspiring, and she is the sweetest person to read about. One of her latest refashions is so cute!

ourlifeisbeautiful

I’ve been following Lisa over at Pattern and Branch for some time, and always love her entries for the Refashioners. And she was the winner in 2015 with this look! She puts so much detail and love into each project!

patternandbranch

Whew, that’s A LOT of inspiration! These makers aren’t even all of my favorites! Have a favorite refashioner not on the list? Share below!